Thread: The Philosophy of Hope

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  1. #1
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    Default The Philosophy of Hope

    Greetings comrades!

    I have put up a post on my blog inspired by the work of German Marxist philosopher Ernst Bloch and am keen to get some feedback on it. Here is a summary of it:


    1. The concept of hope is an appropriate starting point for philosophy
    2. Hope consists of a desire for an outcome and a belief in the outcome’s possibility
    3. One should hope for the best thing that is realistically possible
    4. The best thing that is realistically possible is Universal Perfection
    5. Hoping for Universal Perfection entails striving for a human Utopia (i.e. Communism)
    6. Striving for Utopia provides a grounds for assessing appropriate actions, beliefs and theories
    7. Beliefs which facilitate the progression towards Utopia are progressive. Those which work against it are reactionary
    8. In deciding what actions to take to realise Utopia, theoretical analysis, speculation and interpretation are essential
    9. However, the objective of analysis is not to provide an indubitable foundation for knowledge or action
    10. Rather, the objective of analysis is to provide a reasonable basis for actions, the efficacy of which is assessed by their effects on the progression towards Utopia
    11. The point is not to interpret the world, but change it.


    For a detailed explanation, go to panexperientialism.blogspot.com.au (I am unable to post the full link due to being a new member).

    Comments are welcome!
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    Based on feedback from elsewhere, I have come up with a less wordy version:

    1. The concept of hope is an appropriate starting point for philosophy

    2. Hope consists of a desire for an outcome and a belief in the outcome’s possibility

    3. The best thing to hope for is a world that most people want most

    5. The world that most people want most is Utopia (Communism)

    6. Hoping for Utopia entails striving for Utopia

    7. Striving for Utopia provides grounds for assessing appropriate actions, beliefs and theories

    8. In deciding what actions to take to realise Utopia, theoretical analysis, speculation and interpretation are essential

    9. However, the objective of analysis is not to provide an indubitable foundation for knowledge or action

    10. Rather, the objective of analysis is to provide a reasonable basis for actions, the efficacy of which is assessed by their effects on progression towards Utopia

    11. The point is not to interpret the world, but to change it.
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    ---



    The fact is, that civilisation requires slaves. The Greeks were quite right there. Unless there are slaves to do the ugly, horrible, uninteresting work, culture and contemplation become almost impossible. Human slavery is wrong, insecure, and demoralising. On mechanical slavery, on the slavery of the machine, the future of the world depends. And when scientific men are no longer called upon to go down to a depressing East End and distribute bad cocoa and worse blankets to starving people, they will have delightful leisure in which to devise wonderful and marvellous things for their own joy and the joy of everyone else. There will be great storages of force for every city, and for every house if required, and this force man will convert into heat, light, or motion, according to his needs. Is this Utopian? A map of the world that does not include Utopia is not worth even glancing at, for it leaves out the one country at which Humanity is always landing. And when Humanity lands there, it looks out, and, seeing a better country, sets sail. Progress is the realisation of Utopias.
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    Like it!
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    Good. Glad.

    Your positivism on the concept of 'utopia' reminded me of that passage from Wilde.
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    "The point is not to interpret the world, but to change it."
    Indeed it is so; Thank you!
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    I am reading this book Chris. Thank you for introducing it to us ...
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    Bloch emphasised that utopian feelings and beliefs can have both positive and negative elements. Even religions can have progressive elements, in so far as they foster dreams of a better life (the problem being of course that these dreams are projected out of this world).

    In Marx's time, opium was considered a beneficial and valuable medicine, as well as a drug of addiction producing sloth and torpor.
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    I am reading this book Chris. Thank you for introducing it to us ...

    Yup, thanks for the thanks. I was amazed to have casually found it years ago on the shelf at a bookstore, from Penguin. And now it's online, of course.
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    Bloch emphasised that utopian feelings and beliefs can have both positive and negative elements. Even religions can have progressive elements, in so far as they foster dreams of a better life (the problem being of course that these dreams are projected out of this world).

    In Marx's time, opium was considered a beneficial and valuable medicine, as well as a drug of addiction producing sloth and torpor.

    Equating religion to a drug, huh -- ? (grin)




    Opium of the people

    "Religion is the opium of the people" is one of the most frequently quoted statements of German economist Karl Marx. It was translated from the German original, "Die Religion ... ist das Opium des Volkes."

    https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Opium_of_the_people
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    Yup, thanks for the thanks. I was amazed to have casually found it years ago on the shelf at a bookstore, from Penguin. And now it's online, of course.
    You're welcome!
    True, we sometimes get surprised by incidences as such.
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    Bloch emphasised that utopian feelings and beliefs can have both positive and negative elements. Even religions can have progressive elements, in so far as they foster dreams of a better life (the problem being of course that these dreams are projected out of this world).

    In Marx's time, opium was considered a beneficial and valuable medicine, as well as a drug of addiction producing sloth and torpor.
    I think it is correct to say that Utopian feelings and beliefs can have both positive and negative elements. However, with regards to religions, precisely because they project our best wishes and dreams to another world; they become reactionary.
    Last edited by Stardust; 21st February 2018 at 21:51. Reason: Second thoughts

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