Thread: Marijuana is now legal in 4 more states

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  1. #21
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    No, for the love of God, no.

    I mean, it depends on how you go about that.

    Sure, there's a debate about the effectiveness of prohibition as well, but all too often when alcohol's mentioned I've seen that degenerate into "lol my drug is safer than your drug."

    Just make sure you show why prohibition's ineffective. Don't just say "Why not ban alcohol, too?"

    Also, Wikipedia is not a reliable source.
    My drug is safer than your drug, thats the whole point you can get high off fermented feces but its not safe. Even cocaine and heroine are relatively safe compared to alot of the alternatives out there. The fact that marijuana is safer than alcohol is the reason why its so popular and that argument might not work with people who think alcohol (or even red meat) should be banned, but with them its an entire argument about personal rights, state enforcement, victimless crimes etc. but when you have Jeff sessions claiming marijuana is just as bad as heroin, the FACTUAL knowledge that it is in fact less harmful than heroin is just as important in a legal discussion as it is in a discussion as to what substance where going to get high on tonight before going out.

    btw wikipedia is totally reliable just because some kids like to prank their class when their assigned some obscure topic doesn't mean it's not reliable
  2. #22
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    Default According to Sessions, marijuana is comparable to heroin

    According to Sessions, marijuana is comparable to heroin


    Attorney General Sessions: Marijuana use is NOT comparable to heroin addiction

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    Chris,

    Something is really off with this quote from Attorney General Jeff Sessions:

    "[I] am astonished to hear people suggest that we can solve our heroin crisis by legalizing marijuana — so people can trade one life-wrecking dependency for another that's only slightly less awful."

    To compare marijuana use with heroin addiction is not only insulting to all those afflicted by the tragic opioid epidemic, but it's also just plain ignorant.

    About 13,000 Americans died from heroin overdoses in 2015 alone. In that same year, not one single person overdosed on marijuana (just like every other year, actually). Is that really "only slightly less awful"?

    Attorney General Sessions needs to rescind this statement and make sure that he reviews the facts before making any drug policy decisions.

    Contrary to what Sessions said, extensive research suggests that legalizing marijuana has led to decreases in opioid overdoses. Plus, the tides are changing when it comes to marijuana use. Marijuana is now legal in 23 states, and growing research proves its medicinal use is vast.

    For Attorney General Sessions to ignore the facts in favor his own misguided belief system is really dangerous. He must rescind his statements about marijuana use and face reality.

    Please help counter what Sessions said by signing this petition. We need as many people as we can get to pressure and make sure Sessions checks peer-reviewed research before making any more comments or decisions about drug policy.

    Thank you,

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  3. #23
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    Canada announces it will legalize recreational cannabis, by July 2018. Possibly as early as April 20th this year

    https://qz.com/942770/recreational-m...-trudeau-says/
  4. #24
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    Well, in my previous post I raised the issue of *civil rights*, as in 'it makes no sense for a specialized government force to merely *claim* to have a better grip on substances that are powerful and potentially lethal to the individual'.

    For *any* given drug what matters most is *awareness* and knowledge, something that the government has been *far less than forthright* about -- there's far more to be monetarily gained by creating an artificial dichotomy between 'legal' and 'illegal', and by manipulating the illicit market so as to play cops-and-robbers around it, for high profits and careers (but with market-associated deaths).
    There's money to be gained by the for-profit prison industry, perhaps, but is it really accurate to say that the state somehow profits from prohibition more than it would from effectively replacing black market drug dealers?

    Wikipedia is good for a basic *literacy* about whatever subject, but, sure, one should research deeper if they want to.
    Not really. This is probably a topic for another thread (I remember posting about it ages ago, as well), but Wikipedia is the go-to for lazy research because it's pushed to the top of the results in Google. It's easily abused, whether in the form of hoaxes that go unnoticed for an extended period, or biased portrayals of history, among other things. It's best, perhaps, for most of the natural sciences, but there are much better sources with greater substance for those willing to look even a little harder.

    Back to marijuana, what would you say about reports showing its legalization in Colorado has led to more hospital visits by kids exposed to the drug, as well as an increase in traffic accidents? Even the liberal argument of "bodily sovereignty" suggests that freedom stops when it infringes on another's freedom. For those of us concerned about society as a whole, who won't just shrug our shoulders at those harms, there have to be ways to address this.

    Canada announces it will legalize recreational cannabis, by July 2018. Possibly as early as April 20th this year

    https://qz.com/942770/recreational-m...-trudeau-says/
    They've said July 1 2018, and they won't be letting up on crackdowns on dispensaries selling it prior to legalization.

    That's also just federal legalization. The actual distribution will depend upon decisions by the provinces, and they're dragging their feet until it's actually legal.
    "I'm a pessimist because of intelligence, but an optimist because of will." - Antonio Gramsci

    "If he did advocate revolutionary change, such advocacy could not, of course, receive constitutional protection, since it would be by definition anti-constitutional."
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    There's money to be gained by the for-profit prison industry, perhaps, but is it really accurate to say that the state somehow profits from prohibition more than it would from effectively replacing black market drug dealers?

    I would say the state definitely profits *politically*, akin to its 'War on Terrorism', while, all the time, it's not conducting itself appropriately / seriously for *either*, since it *benefits* whenever it can pose as society's defender from either contrived social ill.


    ---



    Wikipedia is good for a basic *literacy* about whatever subject, but, sure, one should research deeper if they want to.


    Not really. This is probably a topic for another thread (I remember posting about it ages ago, as well), but Wikipedia is the go-to for lazy research because it's pushed to the top of the results in Google.

    *Or* one can just go-to the entry for the topic that one is looking for. I find it valuable for its encyclopedic range and concise wording.



    It's easily abused, whether in the form of hoaxes that go unnoticed for an extended period, or biased portrayals of history, among other things. It's best, perhaps, for most of the natural sciences, but there are much better sources with greater substance for those willing to look even a little harder.

    Sure, I'm not advising anyone to *forgo* deeper research, but I'd rather have Wikipedia around as a basic resource than *not* have it.



    Back to marijuana, what would you say about reports showing its legalization in Colorado has led to more hospital visits by kids exposed to the drug, as well as an increase in traffic accidents?

    I think these are the inevitable side-effects of mainstreaming -- there will have to be an adjustment period for *everyone*, and that *should* include a more-definitive progressive *society-wide* narrative / approach to the issue of marijuana and drug usage generally.



    Even the liberal argument of "bodily sovereignty" suggests that freedom stops when it infringes on another's freedom. For those of us concerned about society as a whole, who won't just shrug our shoulders at those harms, there have to be ways to address this.

    Well, there are also tens of thousands of *deaths* due to cars, etc., and yet society sees this human cost as being necessary and worth-it for the benefit of personalized transportation year after year.



    The table below is a list of motor vehicle deaths in the United States by year. In 2014, 32,675 people were killed in 29,989 crashes, an average of 90 per day.[1]
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  7. #26
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    I would say the state definitely profits *politically*, akin to its 'War on Terrorism', while, all the time, it's not conducting itself appropriately / seriously for *either*, since it *benefits* whenever it can pose as society's defender from either contrived social ill.
    In Oakland possession was decriminalized a few years ago and at the same time police attempted to start "gang curfews" which provided legal cover to stop people for fitting a gang profile... you know, being Asian and driving certain kinds of cars, being a Latino with long hair, being a black man and having dreads. I think this was a bargain to ensure that the political aims of the "war on drugs" could remain even without the most common excuse: I thought I smelled/saw something so I stopped them.



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  9. #27
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    In Oakland possession was decriminalized a few years ago and at the same time police attempted to start "gang curfews" which provided legal cover to stop people for fitting a gang profile... you know, being Asian and driving certain kinds of cars, being a Latino with long hair, being a black man and having dreads. I think this was a bargain to ensure that the political aims of the "war on drugs" could remain even without the most common excuse: I thought I smelled/saw something so I stopped them.



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    We *should* just be calling it 'stereotyping' -- 'profiling', while accurate, is still too much of a concession of meaning....


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    Back to marijuana, what would you say about reports showing its legalization in Colorado has led to more hospital visits by kids exposed to the drug, as well as an increase in traffic accidents? Even the liberal argument of "bodily sovereignty" suggests that freedom stops when it infringes on another's freedom. For those of us concerned about society as a whole, who won't just shrug our shoulders at those harms, there have to be ways to address this.
    i could not keep up with propaganda against marijuana if i tried. the sheer amount of lies told are almost impossible to count, much less list here. The hospital thing is obviously a lie since marijuana is completely non-toxic, it takes 10,000 grams to kill a lab mouse, salt is more dangerous. So while I dont doubt an overprotective mother might've taken her child to the hospital, because he was chewing on a bud there was no need to in fact it was probably good for him, but when you have people like the attorney general telling you its a more dangerous substance than heroin i cant blame them.

    the traffic accident sounds like a lie i know traffic accidents were down after legalization in CO, but even if it wasn't it shouldn't matter, correlation doesn't not equal causation. If traffic accidents were down you wouldn't be allowed to make that argument in favor marijuana to these people, so its complete utter bullshit. They do however like to manipulate data to get a favorable result so they might've taken a 3-4 year block at a time and say that in a 37 month period or whatever accidents were up compared to a previous 37 month period. but thats because theyre looking to make the argument beforehand. no legal authority I know of has made any conclusions about that subject, but im 100% sure 50-100 anti-drug "thinktanks" came up with some bullshit saying it was. one of their favorites is to use "marijuana related incidents" so an accident where the person was blind drunk and high on heroin and the passenger in the backseat had a small bag of marijuana in their pocket, counts as a "marijuana related incident". Marijuana does not really effect your ability to drive. Medical marijuana patients literally smoke everyday before work. You can give someone high as balls on weed a sobriety test and they will pass, it's been proven that not getting enough sleep is more dangerous. I would personally smoke a kilogram of marijuana and a drive a car before I would drive after 3 beers.

    I know anecdotal evidence isn't worth much, but i used to have a 45 min commute and I would smoke every day on my drive back home, I never so much as scratched the paint on my car. I've never been in an accident in my life. unlike a friend of mine who got drunk drove his car to the store with his kids in the backseat slammed into 2 cars less than 1 mile from his house injured 8 people and is doing 5 years in prison right now

    in fact most people will tell you driving while high on weed makes you a slower more careful driver. So coffee actually is more dangerous than marijuana since you are more likely to speed and drive erratic when your "high" on caffeine. So any arguments about bad driving or hospitalizations is garbage propaganda created by people with an agenda who are twisting facts to suit theories.

    http://norml.org/faq
  11. #29
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    I would say the state definitely profits *politically*, akin to its 'War on Terrorism', while, all the time, it's not conducting itself appropriately / seriously for *either*, since it *benefits* whenever it can pose as society's defender from either contrived social ill.
    True, the U.S. government readily exploits any kind of moral panic. Still, while I don't have hard numbers on hand to back this up, marijuana prohibition just doesn't seem anywhere near as politically expedient as it once was.

    Further, the state can prohibit or regulate things because of actual harm they cause, though more for "functionalist" reasons than any serious humanitarian concern. It seems more like an issue of conservative ideological inability to adapt policy (albeit driven by certain policymakers standing to profit from the status quo) than an active attempt by the state to profit directly (as far as i'm aware, it would profit more tangibly from legalization).


    ---

    *Or* one can just go-to the entry for the topic that one is looking for.
    Which is exactly what renders Wikipedia redundant at best and damaging at worst, given my point above.
    The Wikipedia article on the Waco siege, for example, may as well have been written by McVeigh himself.

    I think these are the inevitable side-effects of mainstreaming -- there will have to be an adjustment period for *everyone*, and that *should* include a more-definitive progressive *society-wide* narrative / approach to the issue of marijuana and drug usage generally.
    Fair enough.

    Well, there are also tens of thousands of *deaths* due to cars, etc., and yet society sees this human cost as being necessary and worth-it for the benefit of personalized transportation year after year.
    This analogy is so overused and frankly, ridiculous. Marijuana =/= cars. "Why not ban cars?" really has no bearing whatsoever on the impact of marijuana legalization and how to address the immediate consequences more effectively.

    It's also a rather odd point to make in response to:

    what would you say about reports showing its legalization in Colorado has led to more hospital visits by kids exposed to the drug, as well as an increase in traffic accidents?
    "I'm a pessimist because of intelligence, but an optimist because of will." - Antonio Gramsci

    "If he did advocate revolutionary change, such advocacy could not, of course, receive constitutional protection, since it would be by definition anti-constitutional."
    - J.A. MacGuigan in Roach v. Canada, 1994
  12. #30
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    True, the U.S. government readily exploits any kind of moral panic. Still, while I don't have hard numbers on hand to back this up, marijuana prohibition just doesn't seem anywhere near as politically expedient as it once was.

    Further, the state can prohibit or regulate things because of actual harm they cause, though more for "functionalist" reasons than any serious humanitarian concern. It seems more like an issue of conservative ideological inability to adapt policy (albeit driven by certain policymakers standing to profit from the status quo) than an active attempt by the state to profit directly

    (as far as i'm aware, it would profit more tangibly from legalization).

    You're showing topic-drift -- my comments on state "profit" were this:



    I would say the state definitely profits *politically*

    ...Which you acknowledged with this:



    True, the U.S. government readily exploits any kind of moral panic.

    I myself wouldn't make the new-state-revenue-from-weed argument because I'm not a nationalist and I have no interest in what the state of the state's coffers happen to be at any given moment (more-to-the-point is in what *directions* the state spends its money on).

    I stand by my 'civil rights' position regarding this issue.


    ---



    *Or* one can just go-to the entry for the topic that one is looking for.


    Which is exactly what renders Wikipedia redundant at best and damaging at worst, given my point above.
    The Wikipedia article on the Waco siege, for example, may as well have been written by McVeigh himself.

    So 'going directly to the encyclopedic / Wikipedia entry that one wants' is what 'renders Wikipedia redundant at best and damaging at worst' -- and what other point did you want to include here -- ?


    ---



    I think these are the inevitable side-effects of mainstreaming -- there will have to be an adjustment period for *everyone*, and that *should* include a more-definitive progressive *society-wide* narrative / approach to the issue of marijuana and drug usage generally.


    ---



    Well, there are also tens of thousands of *deaths* due to cars, etc., and yet society sees this human cost as being necessary and worth-it for the benefit of personalized transportation year after year.


    This analogy is so overused and frankly, ridiculous. Marijuana =/= cars. "Why not ban cars?" really has no bearing whatsoever on the impact of marijuana legalization and how to address the immediate consequences more effectively.

    You're jumping to spurious conclusions that are outside of the comparison itself.

    I'm *not* saying 'ban cars', I'm saying -- in line with the 'side-effects of mainstreaming [marijuana]' observation / line above, that society has to have an internal dialogue about what human costs it's willing to pay for the mainstream approach to this-or-that social practice. But, as we all know here, that's most-likely *not* going to happen since capitalist society is a *too-emergent* and brain-dead macro phenomenon that follows from the paradigmatic premise of 'individual-based gain, preferably for profits'.

    The alternative to the waste of human time and effort in driving massive numbers of individual / small-group / small-load vehicles (redundancy of effort) would be the *automation* of such, or driverless vehicles, basically, on the near-horizon. A more politically-principled (revolutionary) approach would be post-capitalist liberated-workers building entirely new mass transportation infrastructure all over the world, to an even and energy-and-logistically-efficient standard (my musings have brought me to potential below-ground and parallel above-ground systems of *conveyor belts* for the direct-distribution of any and all goods, and for individual human transport, in compartments, above).


    ---



    It's also a rather odd point to make in response to:


    what would you say about reports showing its legalization in Colorado has led to more hospital visits by kids exposed to the drug, as well as an increase in traffic accidents?

    Everything new in capitalism tends to be 'Oh, okay, now we're dealing with *this*', instead of 'What should we be doing better as a global society, and to what standards, exactly, and when'.
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    True, the U.S. government readily exploits any kind of moral panic. Still, while I don't have hard numbers on hand to back this up, marijuana prohibition just doesn't seem anywhere near as politically expedient as it once was.
    nixon didn't outlaw drugs because he wanted make that sweet private prison money he did it because...



    "The Nixon campaign in 1968, and the Nixon White House after that, had two enemies: the antiwar left and black people. You understand what I'm saying? We knew we couldn't make it illegal to be either against the war or black, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin, and then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities. We could arrest their leaders, raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course we did."
    http://www.vox.com/2016/3/22/1127876...s-racism-nixon


    industrial hemp as well

    https://www.leafly.com/news/cannabis-101/hemp-101-what-is-hemp-whats-it-used-for-and-why-is-it-illegal

  14. #32
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    Default Massive marijuana report reveals drug's many health effects

    http://newatlas.com/report-marijuana...default-widget


    HEALTH & WELLBEING

    Massive marijuana report reveals drug's many health effects

    John Anderson John Anderson January 13, 2017


    Cannabis and its many effects on users are described by a massive report that looks at 10,000 scientific studies (Credit: hanohiki/Depositphotos)

    There's been no shortage of studies conducted over the years on the effects of marijuana use. But the focus of those studies can be as varied as their conclusions, making it a challenge to wade through the reams of information and get a full read on the drug. A new and lengthy report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine seeks to remedy this by examining more than 10,000 scientific abstracts of cannabis studies published since 1999, reaching nearly 100 conclusions.

    Like the many studies, the report issues a mixed bag of good, bad and inconclusive results. Some of the more significant conclusions are on the therapeutic effects of cannabis and its ability to considerably reduce chronic pain symptoms in adults. It also finds that marijuana use likely increases the risk of developing schizophrenia, various psychoses and social anxiety disorders. The scientists involved with the report point out areas where research is lacking, and suggest ways to improve such scientific efforts while enhancing data collection in support of this research.


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    With the growing acceptance and legalization of both medical and recreational marijuana use, getting a clear view of the effects of the drug, both harmful and beneficial, has never been more needed from a public health standpoint. "The lack of any aggregated knowledge of cannabis-related health effects has led to uncertainty about what, if any, are the harms or benefits from its use," states Marie McCormick, chair of the report committee and professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School. "We conducted an in-depth and broad review of the most recent research to establish firmly what the science says and to highlight areas that still need further examination. As laws and policies continue to change, research must also."

    A nationwide survey found that 22.2 million Americans age 12 and older used marijuana in the past 30 days. Ten percent of use is solely for medical purposes and 90 percent primarily recreational, with 36 percent using it for both. Since 2002, the number of regular users (citing use in the past month) has increased steadily from 6.2 to 8.3 percent.

    Regarding medical benefits, the report finds that oral cannabinoids (tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other chemical compounds) helped to prevent and treat nausea and vomiting that typically results from chemotherapy. It also helped reduce back spasms in adults with multiple sclerosis.

    As for negative outcomes, using marijuana before driving increases the risk of a car accident. The report also finds a greater risk of ingestion (and poisoning) by children in states that had legalized medical marijuana.

    Some good news for marijuana users: there's no evidence that smoking cannabis increases your risk of lung, head or neck cancer, like tobacco use does. But smoking marijuana on a regular basis will lead to more respiratory issues, such as chronic bronchitis, cough and phlegm production. At the same time, regular exposure to marijuana smoke may promote anti-inflammatory activity within the immune system.

    Marijuana use is generally not good for mental health – users are more likely to report thoughts of suicide, while it can increase symptoms for individuals with bipolar disorder. But a history of cannabis use can help those with schizophrenia and other psychoses perform better on learning and memory tasks.

    There is moderate evidence to suggest that using marijuana can lead to substance abuse and dependence on other drugs. Additionally, the younger you start using marijuana, the greater the likelihood of developing problem cannabis use. It's also not surprising that learning, memory and attention are impaired immediately after using marijuana, though there's no evidence of any negative long-term effects in those cognitive functions after you stop smoking.

    Source: National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine

    TAGS #DRUGS #MARIJUANA
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  15. #33
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    Default Congress: Walls Won't Work

    Congress: Walls Won't Work


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    Chris,

    President Trump and Congress are currently negotiating on a spending bill to keep the government funded. Trump’s proposed border wall is taking center stage.

    The White House claims the wall is a “very important tool in stopping drugs from pouring into our country and poisoning our youth.”

    We’ve heard this kind of drug war hysteria before. Have we learned nothing?

    Mandatory minimum sentencing, militarized police, bans on medical research. We’ve seen many absurd things proposed in the name of fighting drugs. We can now add a border wall to the list.

    The United States’ oppressive drug war fuels racial profiling, border militarization, violence against immigrants, intrusive government surveillance and widespread detentions and deportations. Our global war on drugs has contributed to the deaths of over 100,000 Mexicans since 2006.

    A border wall isn’t the solution. An embrace of evidence-based solutions is.

    Tell Congress it’s time for drug policies grounded in science, compassion, health and human rights, not fear and prejudice.

    Until the U.S. addresses addiction and problematic substance use, the production and distribution of drugs will not diminish. No matter how many walls we build.

    There’s an overdose epidemic in this country, and the White House is correct to be concerned. But if President Trump is actually committed to preventing overdose deaths he should propose investments in health-based solutions.

    Medication-assisted treatment, naloxone access, syringe programs, legal access to marijuana, and a host of other evidence-based initiatives. That’s where we should start.

    After losing more than 52,000 people to drug overdose deaths in 2015, it’s clear we need a new approach. It’s time to take drug use out of the criminal justice system and start treating it as a health issue.

    The federal government has spent more than a trillion dollars on oppressive drug war strategies over the past forty years. Yet, drugs remain cheap and widely available.

    A border wall isn’t going to prevent overdose deaths. It’s not going to fix our nation’s drug problems. It’s just another sad example of the drug war increasingly becoming a war against immigrant communities.

    Please take action now.

    Sincerely,

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    The Federal Government doesn't care what the people think or want. Not only is it threatening enforcement of federal marijuana laws in states that have legalized it, it has determined possession of CBD oil, which doesn't even get people high, is a federal offence.

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    Default Drug war escalation has begun….

    Drug war escalation has begun….


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    Chris,

    Today, Attorney General Jeff Sessions called on his prosecutors to pursue harsh sentences for people charged with nonviolent drug offenses. Sessions’ memo rescinds policy instituted by former Attorney General Eric Holder, which avoided draconian mandatory minimums for many drug offenses.

    This is a disastrous move that will increase the prison population, worsen racial disparities in the criminal justice system, and do nothing to reduce drug use or improve public safety. We won't let Sessions take our country back to the 1980s by escalating failed drug war policies.

    Sign our petition to the Department of Justice urging them to rescind this memo immediately. It’s time to adopt smart drug policies instead of resurrecting the failed tactics of the past.

    We warned you about Sessions when he was nominated for Attorney General, and throughout his confirmation hearings. We knew he’d be a nightmare for drug policy and criminal justice reform.

    The memo Sessions issued today leaves no doubt that he and the Trump administration are going to escalate the drug war. We are doing everything in our power to stop them. But we need your help.

    Demand the Department of Justice rescind this memo. Stand against this attempt to return to failed drug war policies that don’t work – add your name to our petition right now.

    Jeff Sessions’ push for long mandatory minimums will destroy the lives of countless people, and tear apart families and communities.

    Together, we must fight back against the “lock ‘em up and throw away the key” mentality that made the United States the number one incarcerator in the world.

    Sincerely,

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    Ahhhhhh.... Ganja. A powerful drug that never agreed with me, no matter how much I tried. Seriously, it fucked me up every time. I've never been one to say " this is completely harmless", like a lot of others do. I used to smoke quite a bit of hash/weed (sometimes even mixed together) and I never enjoyed it, I always panicked and felt terribly. If anyone decides to tell me this is OK and not a problem drug I shall fight them, I shall fight them and I shall kill them.
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    Ahhhhhh.... Ganja. A powerful drug that never agreed with me, no matter how much I tried. Seriously, it fucked me up every time. I've never been one to say " this is completely harmless", like a lot of others do. I used to smoke quite a bit of hash/weed (sometimes even mixed together) and I never enjoyed it, I always panicked and felt terribly. If anyone decides to tell me this is OK and not a problem drug I shall fight them, I shall fight them and I shall kill them.
    you have to start slow you can't just start smoking hash on your first try, I do worry about some of these dispensaries that sell really high quality high potency marijuana to first time smokers especially things like hash oil and edibles. It's like going to a bar when you've never had a drop of alcohol in your whole life, and the bartender lines up 12 shots of overproof rum, instead of just recommending a light beer.

    You should try smoking lower grade marijuana, the panicky feeling is likely coming from high sativa content, which long term users prefer to use in the daytime as it can improve alertness and has less of a drowsy effect but on newer users it can cause a high strung paranoid panicky feeling.
  22. #38
    Join Date Mar 2008
    Location traveling (U.S.)
    Posts 14,886
    Rep Power 62

    Default Sign the petition: Say 'No' to Sessions' War on Drugs

    Sign the petition: Say 'No' to Sessions' War on Drugs


    Jeff Sessions is trying to bring back the War on Drugs.



    Tell Congress: We can't repeat the horrific mistakes of the past. Block Sessions.

    TAKE ACTION


    Chris--Jeff Sessions is trying to reignite the War on Drugs, but we can't let him.

    Just this morning, Sessions released a memo ordering all 94 U.S. Attorneys to seek out the harshest possible sentences for drug offenses--undoing years of work and reversing the historic policy reforms of former Attorney General Eric Holder.1

    Mandatory minimum sentencing disproportionately affects and targets Black people and has been widely condemned for years. A review of federal mandatory sentences showed that Black people are given mandatory minimum sentences at the HIGHEST rate--more than any other group of people.2 Not only is mandatory minimum sentencing racist, research has proven that it’s completely ineffective in curbing drug use.3 The only real purpose this serves is to fill prisons with our people and fill the pockets of private prison companies. Almost HALF of the entire federal prison population consists of people serving time for drug offenses.4

    We need to shut down this clear attempt to fuel mass incarceration, but we have to act fast. Momentum is building against Sessions--even GOP senator, Rand Paul acknowledged the racist history of mandatory minimums and denounced Sessions’ move.5 Now, we’re calling on Congress to block Sessions’ attempts to reignite the War on Drugs. Sentencing reform has bipartisan support in Congress and if we apply enough pressure, we can make sure Sessions can’t dismantle the gains we’ve made in ending mass incarceration. Will you sign the petition?

    Tell Congress: Don’t let Sessions reignite the War On Drugs. Pass a bill to change federal sentencing laws and reverse Sessions’ harsh sentencing mandate.

    It’s no surprise Sessions wants to pack our people into prisons, because Trump cut a deal with the industry that would profit most from it: private prison companies. Campaign finance advocates have filed federal complaints challenging the hundreds of thousands in illegal campaign contributions that GEO Group, one of the largest private prison companies in the country, gave to Trump’s campaign.6 So it’s absolutely no secret why one of the first things Sessions undid was the ban on federal private prisons. And given his statement that he needed to meet the "future needs of the federal correctional system," it’s even more evident why he would push for longer and harsher prison sentences.7

    Sessions is trying to ensure as many people are incarcerated for as long as possible by ordering prosecutors to send people to prison with a one-size-fits-all approach, instead of allowing prosecutors to determine what makes the most sense based on the circumstances of each case. His guidance forces prosecutors to determine sentences based solely on the amount of drugs found. What does that mean? It means that someone facing a drug charge for the very first time, with no prior convictions, no violent history, could face life in prison simply because of the quantity of drugs they have.

    Demand Congress take a stand against racist sentencing laws and shut down Sessions’ attempts to fuel mass incarceration.

    Sharanda Jones is one of the people who was subjected to these unfair and cruel sentencing laws. In the late 90s, Sharanda was subject to a targeted attack on Black residents of Terrell, Texas that led to the arrest of more than 100 Black people for low-level crack cocaine offenses. In an effort to expand the government informant program, prosecutors gave deals to people who snitched and pushed for cruel and unusual sentences for those who didn’t. Sharanda didn’t snitch on a couple she knew who was dealing drugs, and though there was never any evidence that she ever possessed or sold drugs, and this was her first offense ever, she was sentenced to LIFE in prison.8 Luckily, she gained clemency and was released by the Obama administration. If not, she would still be in prison today.

    We can’t let Sessions cause even more pain for Black families by unfairly throwing people away under these cruel laws.

    Sign the petition.

    Until justice is real,

    -- Rashad, Arisha, Scott, Clarise, Anay, Malaya, Enchanta, Katrese, and the rest of the Color Of Change team.

    References:

    1. "Jeff Sessions Rolls Back Obama-Era Drug Sentencing Reforms," The Huffington Post, 05-12-2017
    http://act.colorofchange.org/go/7923....872082.EcA_4h

    2. "The impact of mandatory minimum penalties in federal sentencing," Sentencing Project, 01-01-2016,
    http://act.colorofchange.org/go/7924....872082.EcA_4h

    3. Ibid.

    4. "Number of People Serving Time For Drug, Violent, Property, and Other Offenses In US Prisons," US Dept of Justice Bureau of Justice Statistics, 12-01-2016,
    http://act.colorofchange.org/go/7925....872082.EcA_4h

    5. "Dr. Rand Paul Releases Statement on Attorney General's Action on Mandatory Minimums," Rand Paul, United States Senator for Kentucky, 05-12-2017
    https://act.colorofchange.org/go/792....872082.EcA_4h

    6. "Pay-toPlay on Full Display? Private Prison Contractor Reaps Benefits from Illegal Campaign Spending," The Campaign Legal Center, 04-17-2017
    http://act.colorofchange.org/go/7927....872082.EcA_4h

    7. "Jeff Sessions Believes Private Prisons Help Meet the 'Future Needs of the Federal Correctional System'," The Root, 02-23-2017
    http://act.colorofchange.org/go/7928....872082.EcA_4h

    8. "From A First Arrest To A Life Sentence," The Washington Post, 07-15-2015
    http://act.colorofchange.org/go/7929....872082.EcA_4h


    Color Of Change is building a movement to elevate the voices of Black folks and our allies, and win real social and political change. Help keep our movement strong.

    If you're absolutely sure you don't want to hear from Color Of Change again, click here to unsubscribe.
  23. #39
    Join Date Mar 2008
    Location traveling (U.S.)
    Posts 14,886
    Rep Power 62

    Default May Newsletter

    May Newsletter

    Top Story: Jeff Sessions Escalates Drug War and Urges Prosecutors to Seek Harsher Sentences

    Attorney General Jeff Sessions called on his prosecutors to pursue harsher sentences for people charged with drug law violations in a memo issued this month. Sessions’ memo rescinds policy instituted by former Attorney General Eric Holder, which discouraged draconian mandatory minimums for some drug offenses.

    We warned you about Sessions when he was nominated for Attorney General, and throughout his confirmation hearings. We knew he’d be a nightmare for drug policy and criminal justice reform. The memo Sessions issued this month leaves no doubt that he and the Trump administration are escalating the drug war.

    Read More




    DPA Board Member's Life Threatened for Speaking Out Against Philippines President Duterte

    Drug Policy Alliance Board Member and Columbia neuroscientist Dr. Carl Hart visited the Philippines to speak at a drug policy forum hosted at the University of the Philippines earlier this month. At the forum, Hart called into question the false drug science being espoused by the Philippine authorities to justify their murderous war on drugs.

    In response, The Manila Times published a racist cartoon about Dr. Hart and President Duterte made disparaging and insulting remarks, calling him a “son of a b**** who has gone crazy.” Fearing his life was in danger, Dr. Hart cut short his planned two-week visit and left after only five days to return home. Read more.


    Stories from the Blog

    Trump Will Not Nominate Rep. Tom Marino as Drug Czar

    President Donald Trump will not be nominating Rep. Tom Marino (R-PA) to be director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy (colloquially referred to as the “drug czar”). This is a major victory for the Drug Policy Alliance, which launched a campaign to prevent Marino from being nominated. Marino’s nomination seemed all but certain just a few weeks ago, but a flurry of news stories on his extremist views put pressure on the Administration to go in a different direction.

    --


    No Humanity in São Paulo's Violent Crackdown on Cracolândia

    At dawn, a neighborhood in the center of São Paulo, Brazil awoke to a violent and unanticipated onslaught of nearly a thousand police officers, who descended on residents – many of whom were homeless and many of whom use drugs – with dogs, tasers, and rubber bullets. The area had come to be known as Cracolândia (“Crackland”), and the officers had been sent by São Paulo’s Mayor João Doria to destroy one of the world’s exemplary harm reduction programs, De Braços Abertos (“With Open Arms”).

    --


    Federal Court Strikes Down 90's Era "Cocaine Mom" Law

    A federal court in Wisconsin struck down a regressive drug war law from 1997, commonly referred to as Wisconsin’s “Cocaine Mom” statute. The law allowed the state to seize control of women and detain them in jail or other locked facilities, and force expectant mothers into inappropriate treatment without their consent if they use – or even disclose past use of – any amount of alcohol or an illegal drug. The Court ruled the law unconstitutional and immediately stopped its enforcement statewide.

    --


    New York Times Glosses Over Harms of Alcohol Prohibition in India

    Last month, the New York Times published an article declaring the prohibition of alcohol in the Indian state of Bihar a success. The article skims over that fact that 42,000 people have been arrested and are awaiting trial, in a state where nearly a third of all human rights complaints relate to police and prisons.


    Drug Policy in the News

    NPR: Vermont's Governor Vetoes Recreational Pot Bill

    Reason: Trump's Medical Marijuana Threat Contradicts the Law and His Own Position

    NY Daily News: Addicted to the War on Drugs

    ABC: Pot Convictions Go Up in Smoke with California Legalization

    Popular Science: Study: Magic Mushrooms are the Safest Drug




    Watch Now: DPA Releases Four Drug Facts Videos

    Alcohol and other drugs are inevitably part of our lives in some way, sometimes whether we like it or not. Despite their ubiquity, when you scratch the surface there’s often a lot that people don’t know about how individual drugs work, why they’re illegal (or not) – and especially about how to stay safe if they choose to use a substance.

    The Drug Policy Alliance is working to change that, so we produced a series of four short videos about MDMA, cocaine, heroin and methamphetamine. Watch the videos now!




    2017 Reform Conference — Nominate a Reformer

    Last month, registration officially opened for the International Drug Policy Reform Conference from October 11-14 in Atlanta. If you haven’t registered yet, make sure you do it soon to get the early bird rate and save $100.

    One of the most exciting and important aspects of the Reform Conference is the Achievement Awards ceremony, where we honor reformers who have made exceptional accomplishments in eight award categories – ranging from science and medicine to law and education. Nominate a reformer by June 30th to help us select which exceptional people should receive awards in October!


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  24. #40
    Join Date Apr 2008
    Location Canada
    Posts 1,261
    Rep Power 31

    Default

    You're showing topic-drift
    I don't see how. We as revolutionary leftists may not care about the state revenue argument, but it is certainly relevant to the political profitability of legalization for a bourgeois government. In any case, yes, I acknowledged such a state's tendency to create/exploit moral panic.

    Originally Posted by ckaihatsu]So 'going directly to the encyclopedic / Wikipedia entry that one wants' is what 'renders Wikipedia redundant at best and damaging at worst' -- and what other point did you want to include here -- ?[/QUOTE]

    What? The ability to go directly to an encyclopedic source renders Wikipedia redundant at best and damaging at worst, as a superfluous middleman which pushes reliable sources further down in search results. That's the point.

    [QUOTE="ckaihatsu
    You're jumping to spurious conclusions that are outside of the comparison itself.
    I'm *not* saying 'ban cars',[/QUOTE]

    Of course I didn't mean you were actually suggesting banning cars, but cars seem like an odd choice for an analogous argument about the human cost of mainstreaming marijuana given the latter's link to increased accidents (if you wish, there's an hour-long CBC podcast I could link to which involves numerous interviews on this issue).

    Originally Posted by ckaihatsu
    I'm saying -- in line with the 'side-effects of mainstreaming [marijuana]' observation / line above, that society has to have an internal dialogue about what human costs it's willing to pay for the mainstream approach to this-or-that social practice. But, as we all know here, that's most-likely *not* going to happen since capitalist society is a *too-emergent* and brain-dead macro phenomenon that follows from the paradigmatic premise of 'individual-based gain, preferably for profits'.

    The alternative to the waste of human time and effort in driving massive numbers of individual / small-group / small-load vehicles (redundancy of effort) would be the *automation* of such, or driverless vehicles, basically, on the near-horizon. A more politically-principled (revolutionary) approach would be post-capitalist liberated-workers building entirely new mass transportation infrastructure all over the world, to an even and energy-and-logistically-efficient standard (my musings have brought me to potential below-ground and parallel above-ground systems of *conveyor belts* for the direct-distribution of any and all goods, and for individual human transport, in compartments, above).


    Everything new in capitalism tends to be 'Oh, okay, now we're dealing with *this*', instead of 'What should we be doing better as a global society, and to what standards, exactly, and when'.
    Yeah, sure, fair points. The current system unarguably squanders our resources, potential and lives. We do need to talk about the human costs of a mainstream approach (to drugs, to the environment, etc.) and the "solutions" it offers.
    "I'm a pessimist because of intelligence, but an optimist because of will." - Antonio Gramsci

    "If he did advocate revolutionary change, such advocacy could not, of course, receive constitutional protection, since it would be by definition anti-constitutional."
    - J.A. MacGuigan in Roach v. Canada, 1994

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