Thread: Stand with Colin Kaepernick [Black Lives Matter]

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  1. #1
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    Default Stand with Colin Kaepernick [Black Lives Matter]

    Chris, did you see this? Re: Stand with Colin Kaepernick


    Courage Campaign


    Chris--

    From pro athletes to military veterans to President Obama, Colin Kaepernick’s powerful protest against police violence against black people is winning new backers every day. Click here to join 35,000 other Courage Campaign members who’ve sent a message of support to Colin Kaepernick and his bosses in the NFL.

    The backlash against Kaepernick is also growing. NFL executives called Kaepernick “the most hated player” in the league since Rae Carruth -- who murdered his girlfriend. Hordes of racists are using social media to attack Kaepernick with vile insults and racial epithets. And the conservative noise machine is feeding the hate by misrepresenting his message and smearing him as unpatriotic.

    To show that regular people of all stripes support Kaepernick, we’re going to fly a banner over the 49ers’ game on Monday Night Football, and want to make the biggest impression possible. Click here to join 35,000 other Courage Campaign members who’ve sent a message of support to Colin Kaepernick and his bosses in the NFL.

    Read the message we sent you last week below for more information about Kaepernick’s protest.

    Thanks,

    William



    Chris,

    Black Americans and their allies around the country are protesting persistent mistreatment by police. Now one famous athlete -- Colin Kaepernick, quarterback for the San Francisco 49ers -- is standing up for black lives by kneeling during the national anthem.(1)

    Kaepernick's action shows real courage, and it has been powerfully effective. But it's also made him a target of racist hate and conservatives in the media who have the audacity to question his patriotism.

    When a famous basketball player engaged in a similar protest in 1996, it ended his career.(2) Colin Kaepernick’s actions represent the best of California -- we can't let the same thing happen to him! Will you speak out now to show the NFL, the sports media, and Kaepernick himself that the public supports his brave protest?

    Click here to publicly thank Colin Kaepernick for standing up for black lives!

    Kaepernick just joined a long line of athletes who used their iconic status to stand up to systemic racism. Boxing great Muhammad Ali went to prison for his principles. Runners Tommie Smith and John Carlos raised their fists in protest of America’s treatment of black people during the 1968 Olympics. And Jackie Robinson, who desegregated professional baseball and famously fought for civil rights, wrote in his 1972 autobiography that he could no longer sing the national anthem or salute the flag in good conscience.(3)

    While much has changed in America over the years, one thing has not -- black Americans are still disproportionately stopped by police and subjected to police violence. Black Lives Matter, and the larger Movement for Black Lives, have emerged in response to this reality that black people still live with every day, even in 2016. When superstars like Colin Kaepernick take a public stand for black lives, it magnifies the cultural force of the larger movement -- forcing those who might otherwise ignore the impact police violence has on black communities to think about it.

    Just last night two more NFL athletes joined Kaepernick in his protest.(4) It’s important that we stand with Kaepernick now because we want other athletes and celebrities to know the public has their back when they choose to follow his example!

    Click here to publicly thank Colin Kaepernick for standing up for black lives!

    Kaepernick is the target of hate and anger around the country. On Twitter, vengeful trolls are directing racial slurs and epithets to Kaepernick and his supporters.(5) Conservative commentators are openly questioning Kaepernick’s patriotism, when the right to protest is as American as apple pie. And conservatives are sharing menacing videos on the Internet in which they burn Kaepernick’s jersey while the national anthem plays in the background.(6)

    In the face of this response, it’s especially important that we send messages of support to Colin Kaepernick, as well as to his bosses in the NFL. Professional athletic leagues tend to punish players for causing controversy. In 1994, when extremely talented basketball player Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf engaged in a similar protest it ended his NBA career.(7) And when NFL punter Chris Kluwe spoke out for gay rights in 2014, he was pushed out of the league.(8)

    Just last night, Colin Kaepernick continued his protest in a battle between the San Francisco 49ers and the San Diego Chargers, two California football legacies. As scrutiny on Kaepernick rises, there is no better time to support his bold actions.

    Click here to show your support for Colin Kaepernick’s powerful protest today!

    Thank you for having the courage to stand with Colin Kaepernick,

    William, along with Annie, Caitlin, Emma, Eddie, Ernesto, Katie, Kelsey, Lindsay, Moonyoung, Scottie, and Tim (the Courage team)

    1. http://ftw.usatoday.com/2016/08/coli...m-sit-explains
    2. http://edition.cnn.com/2016/08/29/sp...-history-trnd/
    3. http://www.theroot.com/articles/cult...angled-banner/
    4. http://www.espn.com/nfl/story/_/id/1...ational-anthem
    5. http://blacksportsonline.com/home/20...gger-comments/
    6. http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com...rnick-jerseys/
    7. http://theundefeated.com/features/ab...tional-anthem/
    8. http://deadspin.com/i-was-an-nfl-pla...-an-1493208214


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    Courage Campaign Institute is a 501c(3) non-profit organization. Contributions or gifts to Courage Campaign Institute are tax deductible within IRS guidelines.

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  3. #2
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    Default Retaliation for documenting police abuse

    Retaliation for documenting police abuse


    Protect those who document police misconduct.
    View this email in your browser

    Chris,

    Since the killing by police of Michael Brown in Ferguson nearly two years ago, protesters, witnesses, and victims of police brutality have increasingly taken to their phones to monitor and record police behavior.

    In the two recent deadly police shootings of Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge and Philando Castile in St. Paul, bystanders documented the events and immediately made their videos public. In both of these cases, the individuals documenting the events allege that police later harassed them in retaliation.

    Stand with PEN America, People Demanding Action, and the ACLU in demanding that the U.S. Department of Justice investigate this troubling trend of alleged police retaliation against witnesses of possible misconduct.



    Just 24 hours after posting video of officers fatally shooting Alton Sterling, Chris LeDay was arrested at his place of work and told he fit the description of a suspect wanted for assault. His arrest warrant referenced only old traffic tickets.

    Lavish “Diamond” Reynolds, the fiancée of Philando Castile who recorded their deadly encounter with police, was handcuffed and taken away for questioning immediately after recording her husband-to-be’s death at the hands of an officer. Reynolds told reporters that police confiscated her phone and that she was denied water and food during a long night in detention.

    Bystanders who filmed the arrests and deaths of Freddie Gray and Eric Garner have described similar police harassment and abuse, sometimes continuing for months after the incident.

    These allegations strongly suggest that some police officers are retaliating against those who document police brutality. According to the U.S Department of Justice, the First Amendment prohibits government officials from “punish[ing] the dissemination of information relating to alleged governmental misconduct.”

    While the police may have legitimate business with individuals involved in documenting cases of alleged police abuse, utmost care must be taken to avoid both the reality and the appearance of retaliation.

    Acts of journalism are not limited to official members of the press. In the age of camera phones and social media, police must be trained on the rights of citizen journalists, and these rights must be guaranteed to all.

    Sign the petition today. Tell U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch to investigate police retaliation against people who record the police and to guarantee their First Amendment rights.

    My best,


    Suzanne Nossel
    Executive Director
    PEN America



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  4. #3
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    Default NFL football players spread protests over police violence, racism

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  6. #4
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    Default Indict officer who killed Terence Crutcher

    Indict officer who killed Terence Crutcher


    Officer Betty Shelby shot and killed Terence Crutcher.

    Indict Officer Betty Shelby.



    Indict Now!

    TAKE ACTION!


    Dear Chris,

    Terence Crutcher was on his way home from class when his truck stalled in the middle of the road in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Four police officers responded to this call with guns drawn. A helicopter hovered over him and his car as he walked with his hands up. Seconds later Terence was shot and killed by officer Betty Shelby.1 His crime was being a large Black man.

    Officer Shelby shot and killed Terence because she saw him not only as a threat due to his Blackness, but as a disposable being. She saw her racist projection of a big, Black “bad dude”.2

    Demand Officer Shelby be indicted for her barbaric “shoot first” tactics. There’s no room for officers who see Black bodies as threats!

    This is a story that went “unnoticed” in the media until the extremely disturbing video footage was released and it showed Terence clearly cooperating and officers blatantly racially profiling him to death. It’s clear that the image of a big Black man with his hands raised was a threat for Officer Shelby, a threat that informed her it was ok to shoot and kill Terence. Shelby didn’t see Terence’s humanity, she didn’t allow him the benefit of being a person in need of help.

    Officer Betty Shelby needs to be indicted immediately for the killing of Terence Crutcher.

    Terence was one of many Black folks killed by police last week including 13-year-old Ty’re King in Columbus, OH.3 It’s heartbreaking and traumatic to experience this reality so frequently with no justice or accountability. Officer Shelby’s fatal reaction to a Black body is something that seems to be ingrained into the psyche of most officers across the country. We must hold officers like Betty Shelby accountable if we are going to change the violent and racist culture of policing.

    Paid leave is not justice for Terence or any of us! Indict Officer Shelby NOW!

    Until justice is real,

    Scott, Rashad, Arisha, Scott, Malaya, Enchanta, and the rest of the Color Of Change team


    References:

    “Tulsa Police shooting investigaed by Justice Depatment,” CNN, 09.20.2016. https://act.colorofchange.org/go/670....872082.nwtuQA

    “Terence Crutcher's twin sister: 'that big bad dude was my brother',” The Griot, 09.20.2016 https://act.colorofchange.org/go/671....872082.nwtuQA

    “Ty're King likely running away at time of shooting, according to Forensic Pathologist,” Walton+ Brown, 09.19.2016. https://act.colorofchange.org/go/671....872082.nwtuQA


    Color Of Change is building a movement to elevate the voices of Black folks and our allies, and win real social and political change. Help keep our movement strong.

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    Default FRSO: Police killings must stop, fight for community control of police

    FRSO: Police killings must stop, fight for community control of police

    By staff

    San Jose, CA - After the police killing of two more Black men in Tulsa, Oklahoma and Charlotte, North Carolina, on Sept. 21, Masao Suzuki, chair of the Joint Nationalities Commission of the Freedom Road Socialist Organization, condemned the epidemic of police crimes and urged people to build the movement.

    “The killing of Terrance Crutchner by a white police officer in Tulsa, Oklahoma is just the latest example of police shooting first, not calling for medical aid, and then making up stories to justify their crimes,” said Suzuki. “In Charlotte, North Carolina, the uprising after the police shot and killed Keith Scott shows that the community is on edge. This should come as no surprise given that a white Charlotte police officer went free after shooting an unarmed Black man ten times and then handcuffing him before he died in 2013.”

    Suzuki called for people to continue to build the movement against police killings. “In addition to responding to each and every police crime, the FRSO supports the demand for community control of the police. This institutional change, as seen in the Chicago, Illinois push for a Civilian Police Accountability Council (CPAC), is needed to fight the racism among police that is part of a long history of national oppression against African Americans and other oppressed nationalities such as Chicanos and Native Americans.”

    Read more News and Views from the Peoples Struggle at http://www.fightbacknews.org. You can write to us at [email protected]
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    Default All out in Solidarity with Charlotte - Sat., Sept 24 1pm

    All out in Solidarity with Charlotte - Sat., Sept 24 1pm


    All Out in Solidarity with Charlotte Uprising Against Police Terror!
    *READ* Moorehead/Lilly campaign solidarity statement with Charlotte uprising!

    SHOW UP IN CHARLOTTE!
    A call to mobilize 1,000s against police violence
    Saturday, September 24th | 1pm
    March starting from Marshall Park in Uptown Charlotte | 800 East 3rd St.

    All ages, rain or shine
    Invitation from The Tribe CLT and Charlotte Trans and Queer People of Color Collective

    Come to Charlotte this Saturday to stand with us and gather together.

    On Tuesday, our brother and neighbor Keith Lamont Scott was killed by Charlotte police. He was sitting in his car, reading a book, and waiting for his son to come home on the school bus. We believe he was profiled and killed by police, and that CMPD is not telling the truth about his murder.

    Tuesday night, Charlotte police attacked a grieving community with riot police and tear gas. Wednesday night, Charlotte police fired into a crowd, seriously injuring a protestor and inflaming our grief.

    Today, our city is occupied by the National Guard and we are in a State of Emergency!

    Charlotte, the latest city to be wrecked by police violence against Black people and violence against Black people, is a national crisis. We need to end this epidemic now! Let’s show the nation that we stand against police violence that targets Black people and our communities. Let’s show that Charlotte, and the nation, will no longer tolerate the routine murders of Black people by an unaccountable system of policing.
    Come to Charlotte to make a historic stand and to demand dignity and respect for Black lives.

    We are: Charlotte Tribe, Charlotte Trans and Queer People of Color Collective, Charlotte SURJ, Ignite NC, Black Youth Project-Durham Chapter, Beloved Community Center, Youth Organizing Institute , Southern Vision Alliance, Durham Solidarity Center, Workers World Party, Queer People Of Color Collective GSO, NC TROUBLMakers, Million Hoodies, Black University.



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  9. #7
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    Default Charlotte is on fire.

    Charlotte is on fire.


    A new NC law could mean we will never see the footage of Keith Scott's murder.



    Demand the Department of Justice take action against North Carolina's blue wall of silence.

    TAKE ACTION!

    Chris,

    Charlotte is on fire. And Black people are in pain yet again as the news of Keith Lamont Scott’s killing hit less than 24 hours after news outlets plastered the video of Terence Crutcher’s murder on tv screens across the country.1

    According to his family, Keith Lamont Scott, a 43-year-old disabled man, was sitting in his car reading a book and waiting to pick his son up from school when he was shot and killed by Charlotte police. Yes, a book. They say he didn’t have a gun. And in a live video immediately after the incident, Keith’s daughter yelled at investigators not to plant a gun in his car. “Because that’s what the f**k y’all do,” she said.2

    Charlotte police had no regard for Keith's life and are telling a completely different tale of events leading to Keith’s killing. But a new North Carolina law could mean the public will never see the body cam footage.

    North Carolina just passed a law, HB 972, that prohibits body and dash cam footage from being released to the public.3 And while the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Chief, Kerr Putney, has the authority to release the footage of Keith Lamont Scott’s death before the law goes into effect in October--he won’t. But the good news is that the Department of Justice has the authority to push them to do the right thing, and hit Charlotte police where it hurts--their pockets. Soon, the Justice Department will be announcing winners of their federal grant programs. If the DOJ refuses to award any new grants to North Carolina while this law is in place, they could force the state to reverse it. Will you sign the petition?

    Tell the DOJ: Don’t reward North Carolina police with new grants until it overturns HB 972.

    Police rolled up on Keith in plain clothes and were attempting to serve an arrest warrant for someone else. They had the wrong person. But in step with the dangerous police culture of hyper-violence and a “shoot first” mentality, Charlotte police acted in complete disregard for his life, shot and killed him. Now his children are without a father and a family is seeking answers--but Charlotte-Mecklenburg police are refusing to release the footage that could provide some.

    Too often police have been caught lying. And the cases of Walter Scott, Terence Crutcher, Tamir Rice. Sandra Bland, LaQuan McDonald, and Sam Dubose show us the importance of having access to the video footage.4 North Carolina launched its universal body-cam program last year--yet they’ve barely gotten any good use out of it. Since May, Charlotte-Mecklenburg police have shot and killed four people--and body cameras were turned on in only one.5 Still, lawmakers passed HB 972, a law that would prohibit the public from ever seeing body cam footage, unless they obtained a court order. It’s a slap in the face to any calls for transparency and accountability and defeats the entire purpose of even having body-cameras.

    But even if local officials won’t use their power to release the video footage, the Department of Justice can. When North Carolina lawmakers passed a terribly transphobic law, HB 2, that allowed discrimination against transgender folks, the Justice Department threatened to sue the state--and even got them to back down from a counter-lawsuit.6 On Wednesday, Attorney General Lynch gave a speech noting the “sorrow, anger and uncertainty” people are feeling right now after dealing with the trauma of Black people being killed again, and again, and again.7 But the best way her office can assure accountability and transparency in Keith Lamont Scott’s murder is to take action against North Carolina’s terrible blue wall of silence. Keith’s family deserves justice and full transparency.

    Demand the Department of Justice take action against the law allowing Charlotte police to protect their own by hiding the truth.

    Until justice is real,

    Arisha, Rashad, Scott, Clarise, Anay, and the rest of the Color Of Change team


    References:

    "Keith Lamont Scott: 5 Fast Facts You Should Know," Heavy, September 20, 2016

    "Keith Scott shooting: Charlotte police say they warned him to drop handgun," The Guardian, September 22, 2016

    "New North Carolina law might prevent Keith Lamont Scott body cam footage from release," New York Daily News, September 21, 2016
    "Caught on Tape, Caught in a Lie: 5 Times Video Proved Police Were Lying," The Root, February 22, 2016
    "Charlotte's top cop claims he can't show you videos that prove Keith Scott's killing was justified," ThinkProgress, September 21, 2016
    "North Carolina Governor Drops 'Bathroom Bill' Lawsuit Against U.S.," NPR, September 19, 2016
    "Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch Delivers Remarks at the International Bar Association's 2016 Annual Conference," The United States Department of Justice, September 21, 2016

    Color Of Change is building a movement to elevate the voices of Black folks and our allies, and win real social and political change. Help keep our movement strong.

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  10. #8
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    Default The Movement for Black Lives platform

    The Movement for Black Lives platform


    Dear MoveOn member,

    This week, footage was released of a man named Terence Crutcher being gunned down by Oklahoma police—once again forcing the crisis of police violence against Black Americans into sharp focus.1

    In the video footage, Crutcher, whose car had broken down on the highway, appears to be cooperating with police—in fact, he even has his hands raised above his head—when he is stunned with a taser gun before being shot to death. The officer who killed Crutcher has now been charged with first-degree manslaughter—after days of outrage and an outpouring of attention and grief from across the country.2

    At the same time, in North Carolina, the Charlotte community is reeling from the death of Keith Lamont Scott, also at the hands of police, who have not yet released their video of the killing.3

    Already this year, at least 194 Black people have been killed by police.4

    As America grapples with these deaths, there are real steps we, as a nation, could take to address systemic racism, mass incarceration, and the individuals and institutions that use racial division to propagate economic inequality. A number of innovative solutions were put forward in a recently published paper called "A Vision for Black Lives"—a detailed policy platform released by more than 50 organizations from across the country who are fueling the powerful grassroots movement that's responding to police violence, among other injustices.

    This is much longer than a tweet or a quick graphic you can share, but it's an important read. Will you take a moment to read the Movement for Black Lives platform now, and then urge your friends to read it too?

    If enough of us take a few minutes to read and share this, we can help fuel the national discussion about concrete solutions.

    The Movement for Black Lives platform addresses criminal justice, reparations, investment and divestment, economic justice, community control, and political power. It's an important step toward finding real solutions that can address the many complicated factors that lead to police violence, such as the violence that ended Terence Crutcher's and Keith Lamont Scott's lives this week.

    Without a countervailing vision, the systems that work against racial justice and equality only become more entrenched.

    It's a long document, and not everyone will agree with every proposal or phrase. But reading it, discussing it, sharing it with our neighbors, and demanding that our candidates react to it could move us forward in a concrete way. And it will take all of us—of every race and with every nuanced and intersecting identity we bring—to work together to develop solutions.

    Please, take a moment to read and share the Movement for Black Lives platform now, and let’s get to work.

    Thanks for all you do.

    —Corinne, Mark, Scott, Anna, and the rest of the team

    Sources:

    1. "Video shows unarmed black man Terence Crutcher shot by Tulsa officer," USA Today, September 20, 2016
    http://act.moveon.org/go/5887?t=4&ak...7761820.9hBdVT

    2. "Tulsa police officer charged with manslaughter," CNN, September 23, 2016
    http://act.moveon.org/go/5888?t=6&ak...7761820.9hBdVT

    3. "Charlotte Police Chief: Video Doesn't Show "Definitive" Proof Keith Scott Pointed a Gun at Cops," Slate, September 22, 2016
    http://act.moveon.org/go/5889?t=8&ak...7761820.9hBdVT

    4. " The Counted: People killed by police in the US," The Guardian, accessed September 23, 2016
    https://act.moveon.org/go/5890?t=10&...7761820.9hBdVT



    Want to support our work? MoveOn member contributions have powered our work together for more than 17 years. Hundreds of thousands of people chip in each year—which is why we're able to be fiercely independent, answering to no individual, corporation, politician, or political party. You can become a monthly donor by clicking here, or chip in a one-time gift here.


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    - - - Updated - - -

    Charlotte uprising demands justice for Keith Lamont Scott



    By Noah Killough

    Charlotte, NC - On the night of Sept. 21 protesters gathered in uptown Charlotte for the second night of militant protests after the murder of Keith Lamont Scott by Charlotte police (CMPD). Protesters called for the arrest of the officers involved and an end to police crimes in the city.

    Protesters first pushed up Elizabeth Avenue after a short demonstration in front of the CMPD headquarters. They then occupied the Epicentre shopping and entertainment complex. The protesters reached as far as the Omni Hotel until an African American man was shot in front of riot police. Some protesters at the scene say they saw the police shoot the man. When the shot was fired the only guns visible were in police hands.

    “They won’t stop killing us!” a protester shouted shortly after.

    Then riot police used tear gas and rubber bullets to continue to push the protesters back down Elizabeth Avenue. People then spread out across the city and some briefly occupied a portion of Interstate 277.

    Throughout the night the police escalated the situation, taking advantage of calm breaks in the protest to shoot tear gas and rubber bullets. Before the end of the night, police arrested 44 protesters.

    Despite the deployment of North Carolina National Guard troops to Charlotte, protests will continue until there is justice for Keith Lamont Scott.

    Read more News and Views from the Peoples Struggle at http://www.fightbacknews.org. You can write to us at [email protected]
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    Default White Tulsa officer charged in death of unarmed black man, freed on bond

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.b57c9888324c


    White Tulsa officer charged in death of unarmed black man, freed on bond

    By Peter Holley and Katie Zezima September 23 at 10:29 AM

    Officer charged in Terence Crutcher's death


    Copy Play Video1:33
    If convicted, Tulsa police officer Betty Shelby could face a minimum of four years in prison. (Gillian Brockell/The Washington Post)
    A white police officer in Tulsa who was shown on video fatally shooting an unarmed black man has been charged with first-degree manslaughter, authorities said on Thursday.

    Tulsa District Attorney Steve Kunzweiler filed a “heat-of-passion” manslaughter charge against officer Betty Shelby, nearly a week after cameras filmed her shooting 40-year-old Terence Crutcher as he stood beside his stalled SUV.

    Shelby “reacted unreasonably” and became “emotionally involved to the point that she overreacted,” the prosecutor’s office said in an affidavit.

    She was formally arrested and booked into the Tulsa Jail at 1 a.m. Friday, according to county records. She posted a $50,000 bond and was released from jail 20 minutes after she was booked.

    Moments before they captured footage of Crutcher’s death, police cameras recorded the father of four walking toward his car with his hands above his head while several officers followed closely behind with weapons raised. He lingered at his vehicle’s driver’s side window, his body facing the SUV, before slumping to the ground a second later.

    “Shots fired!” a female voice can be heard yelling in video footage released Monday, three days after the deadly encounter.

    Tulsa police say Crutcher did not have a gun on him or in his vehicle.

    The footage does not offer a clear view of when Shelby fired the shot that killed Crutcher. Her attorney, Scott Wood, has said Crutcher was not following police commands and that Shelby opened fire when the man began to reach through his window.

    Wood told the Tulsa World that Shelby opened fire and that another officer used a stun gun when Crutcher’s “left hand goes through the car window.”

    Shelby is one of only a few female officers to be charged in a fatal shooting in the past decade. If convicted, she could face a minimum of four years in prison.

    [‘He was my compassionate son,’ Terence Crutcher’s mother says after fatal shooting in Tulsa]

    In a statement, Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin (R) said she hopes the decision “provides some peace” to the Crutcher family and urged people to be patient as the case unfolds.


    “No matter how you feel about the prosecutors’ decision in this case, I hope Oklahomans will respect the views of your friends and neighbors because we still have to live peacefully together as we try to make sense of the circumstances that led to Mr. Crutcher’s death,” Fallin said.

    The fatal Sept. 16 shooting, already one of the nation’s dominant news stories, gained an even higher profile after police shot and killed a black man in Charlotte Tuesday afternoon, sparking violent protests.

    Crutcher and Scott are two of at least 707 people — 164 of them black men — who have been fatally shot by police officers this year, according to a Washington Post database tracking police shootings.

    Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch said the two shootings — four days and 1,000 miles apart — again laid bare friction between law enforcement officials and the communities they police.

    “These tragic incidents have once again left Americans with feelings of sorrow, anger and uncertainty,” Lynch said Wednesday. “They have once again highlighted — in the most vivid and painful terms — the real divisions that still persist in this nation between law enforcement and communities of color.”

    The Justice Department has opened a civil rights investigation into Crutcher’s death.

    [Release the video or not? Cities wrestle with approaches after police shootings.]

    Shelby thought Crutcher was behaving like someone under the possible influence of the drug phencyclidine (PCP), Wood told the World, noting that Crutcher ignored the officer’s commands to stop reaching into his pockets. Shelby feared Crutcher might have a gun, he said. A police official told the World that PCP was found in Crutcher’s vehicle; an attorney for Crutcher’s family has said reports linking Crutcher to drugs were attempts to “intellectually justify” his death.

    “Make no mistake, it was clear from the beginning that charges were necessary in this case. The officer responsible for the death of Terence Crutcher had to be brought to justice to be held accountable for her actions,” Crutcher family attorney Benjamin Crump said in a statement Thursday. “We remain optimistic that the State Attorney will now do his job, and vigorously prosecute the officer to the fullest extent of the law, bringing some form of justice to the Crutcher family.”

    Does the helicopter video prove Crutcher's window was closed? Play Video1:13

    An attorney for Terence Crutcher's family says enhanced footage of the traffic stop on Sept. 16 proves the car's window was closed at the time Crutcher was shot by a Tulsa police officer. Here is that footage. (Gillian Brockell/The Washington Post)
    Shelby is a five-year veteran of the Tulsa Police Department. Wood, who did not return a request for comment, told the World that Shelby is “very distraught” over the shooting and that she has received death threats.

    According to reports, Shelby is married to fellow officer David Shelby, who was in a helicopter that recorded the fatal shooting and was recorded talking with a fellow officer about how they believed Crutcher should be shot with a stun gun. One of them said he looked “like a bad dude.”


    “He was my compassionate son,” the slain man’s mother, Leanna Crutcher, said in an interview with CNN. “No one could ever do anything that would turn him away from being their friend. He loved people.”

    “That big, bad dude mattered,” his twin sister Tiffany said.

    [She started the night drinking at home — and ended it being pepper-sprayed in a restraint chair]

    Betty Shelby worked at the Tulsa Sheriff’s Department from June 2007 to November 2011, according to Deputy Justin Green, a department spokesman. Shelby was involved in a use-of-force incident at the department for “firearms presentation,” Green said. Shelby and other officers entered a home with their firearms drawn as they were trying to serve warrants.

    According to her 2007 application to the sheriff’s office, Shelby said she had been married twice before and was on track to receive a biology degree from Northeastern State University in Broken Arrow, Okla. She had previously worked as a convenience store manager, teacher assistant and trainee in the Oklahoma Air National Guard. Shelby wrote that she sprained her knee during basic training and that the Guard did not want to “take care of my rehabilitation,” so she was discharged.

    On the application, which was obtained by NBC affiliate KJRH, Shelby answered “yes” to questions about whether she had used drugs and whether she had a victim protection order filed against her. Shelby said she had used marijuana twice as an 18-year-old.

    The scene after an unarmed black man was fatally shot by a Tulsa police officer


    The man was fatally shot by a white police officer responding to a stalled vehicle.

    In an expanded answer, Shelby wrote that in 1993, she and a boyfriend had an argument where they ended their relationship. She said the boyfriend hit her car with a shovel and that she did the same to his vehicle. The two filed orders against each other and asked a judge to dismiss them, she wrote.

    In 2000, Shelby and an ex-husband were in a custody battle that was appealed to the Oklahoma Supreme Court. In 2002, she wrote that her ex-husband’s wife filed a protective order against Shelby, alleging she made harassing phone calls. Shelby wrote the order was denied.

    In 2004, Shelby spoke at a rally attended by about 6,000 people, including members of Congress and Tulsa’s mayor, that showed support for deployed U.S. troops. David Shelby was stationed overseas with the Army; according to the World he was a reservist who volunteered for duty.

    “I knew there was always a possibility he was going to be deployed sometime,” Betty Shelby said at the rally. “He knows this is his duty, and he’s proud to serve his country.”

    In a Facebook posting from Aug. 28, Shelby is pictured standing with a black couple and holding a bouquet of flowers. The couple, identified as the Joneses, were robbed, and Shelby found their property and returned it to them.

    “Well done, Officer Shelby and thanks to the Joneses for making her day,” the post read.

    This article, originally published on Sept. 22, has been updated.

    MORE READING:

    Charlotte police won’t make shooting video public; chief says footage is not ‘definitive’

    More police shootings are being caught on camera — but many of those videos aren’t released to the public

    1.9k Comments
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    Peter Holley is a general assignment reporter at The Washington Post. He can be reached at [email protected]. Follow @peterjholley
    Katie Zezima is a national political correspondent covering the 2016 presidential election. She previously served as a White House correspondent for The Post. Follow @katiezez

    © 1996-2016 The Washington Post
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    Default Charlotte police killed him.

    RE: Charlotte police killed him.


    Chris,

    BREAKING: Charlotte Police Chief, Kerr Putney, just made a partial release of dash cam and body cam footage of Keith Lamont Scott's murder.1 And it's devastating to watch.

    Keith slowly exits his car, and turns around with his hands at his sides, and within seconds police shoot him down. Neither of the videos show definitive evidence of Keith Scott holding a gun as police have claimed--and after police shot and killed Keith Scott, they handcuffed his lifeless body. To make matters worse, Putney has still refused to release the full video, claiming it is not relevant to the shooting. A partial video release is not enough, but if this killing happened a week from today, even this would be impossible.

    A new North Carolina law goes into effect on October 1st, and will prohibit any body-cam or dash-cam footage from being released to the public. It's infuriating and a slap in the face to Black people who've been in the streets demanding transparency and reform.

    In just a few hours, you and over 33,000 Color of Change members signed a petition calling on the Department of Justice to take action against this law. Now more than ever, we need as many people as possible to sign so the Justice Department will take notice--will you share this petition on Facebook?

    We have to make sure North Carolina police can't hide behind a blue wall of silence any longer.

    -Arisha

    P.S. Here's the email we sent this morning:



    A new NC law could mean we will never see the footage of Keith Scott's murder.



    Demand the Department of Justice take action against North Carolina's blue wall of silence.

    TAKE ACTION!


    Chris,

    Charlotte is on fire. And Black people are in pain yet again as the news of Keith Lamont Scott’s killing hit less than 24 hours after news outlets plastered the video of Terence Crutcher’s murder on tv screens across the country.2

    According to his family, Keith Lamont Scott, a 43-year-old disabled man, was sitting in his car reading a book and waiting to pick his son up from school when he was shot and killed by Charlotte police. Yes, a book. They say he didn’t have a gun. And in a live video immediately after the incident, Keith’s daughter yelled at investigators not to plant a gun in his car. “Because that’s what the f**k y’all do,” she said.3

    Charlotte police had no regard for Keith's life and are telling a completely different tale of events leading to Keith’s killing. But a new North Carolina law could mean the public will never see the body cam footage.

    North Carolina just passed a law, HB 972, that prohibits body and dash cam footage from being released to the public.4 And while the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Chief, Kerr Putney, has the authority to release the footage of Keith Lamont Scott’s death before the law goes into effect in October--he won’t. But the good news is that the Department of Justice has the authority to push them to do the right thing, and hit Charlotte police where it hurts--their pockets. Soon, the Justice Department will be announcing winners of their federal grant programs. If the DOJ refuses to award any new grants to North Carolina while this law is in place, they could force the state to reverse it. Will you sign the petition?

    Tell the DOJ: Don’t reward North Carolina police with new grants until it overturns HB 972.

    Police rolled up on Keith in plain clothes and were attempting to serve an arrest warrant for someone else. They had the wrong person. But in step with the dangerous police culture of hyper-violence and a “shoot first” mentality, Charlotte police acted in complete disregard for his life, shot and killed him. Now his children are without a father and a family is seeking answers--but Charlotte-Mecklenburg police are refusing to release the footage that could provide some.

    Too often police have been caught lying. And the cases of Walter Scott, Terence Crutcher, Tamir Rice. Sandra Bland, LaQuan McDonald, and Sam Dubose show us the importance of having access to the video footage.5 North Carolina launched its universal body-cam program last year--yet they’ve barely gotten any good use out of it. Since May, Charlotte-Mecklenburg police have shot and killed four people--and body cameras were turned on in only one.6 Still, lawmakers passed HB 972, a law that would prohibit the public from ever seeing body cam footage, unless they obtained a court order. It’s a slap in the face to any calls for transparency and accountability and defeats the entire purpose of even having body-cameras.

    But even if local officials won’t use their power to release the video footage, the Department of Justice can. When North Carolina lawmakers passed a terribly transphobic law, HB 2, that allowed discrimination against transgender folks, the Justice Department threatened to sue the state--and even got them to back down from a counter-lawsuit.7 On Wednesday, Attorney General Lynch gave a speech noting the “sorrow, anger and uncertainty” people are feeling right now after dealing with the trauma of Black people being killed again, and again, and again.8 But the best way her office can assure accountability and transparency in Keith Lamont Scott’s murder is to take action against North Carolina’s terrible blue wall of silence. Keith’s family deserves justice and full transparency.

    Demand the Department of Justice take action against the law allowing Charlotte police to protect their own by hiding the truth.

    Until justice is real,

    Arisha, Rashad, Scott, Clarise, Anay, and the rest of the Color Of Change team


    References:

    "Charlotte shooting: Police release video and photo evidence," CNN, September 24, 2016
    "Keith Lamont Scott: 5 Fast Facts You Should Know," Heavy, September 20, 2016
    "Keith Scott shooting: Charlotte police say they warned him to drop handgun," The Guardian, September 22, 2016
    "New North Carolina law might prevent Keith Lamont Scott body cam footage from release," New York Daily News, September 21, 2016
    "Caught on Tape, Caught in a Lie: 5 Times Video Proved Police Were Lying," The Root, February 22, 2016
    "Charlotte's top cop claims he can't show you videos that prove Keith Scott's killing was justified," ThinkProgress, September 21, 2016
    "North Carolina Governor Drops 'Bathroom Bill' Lawsuit Against U.S.," NPR, September 19, 2016
    "Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch Delivers Remarks at the International Bar Association's 2016 Annual Conference," The United States Department of Justice, September 21, 2016

    Color Of Change is building a movement to elevate the voices of Black folks and our allies, and win real social and political change. Help keep our movement strong.

    If you're absolutely sure you don't want to hear from Color Of Change again, click here to unsubscribe.
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    Default Black Lives Matter protest in Houston's Third Ward

    Black Lives Matter protest in Houston's Third Ward



    By Fabian Van Onzin

    Houston, TX - Over 100 people marched through Houston's Third Ward, Sept. 24, to protest police brutality and demand justice for victims of police killings. The march began with a few speeches in front of the Martin Luther King statue in MacGregor Park, located near the University of Houston. After dozens of people had gathered, they began to march in the streets.

    The protesters marched into the street chanting “Black lives matter!” and defied police orders to take up only one lane. Dozens of cops appeared, but the protesters kept marching through the streets. They marched through the University of Houston, and students from all over the campus joined in.

    After rallying on the campus, they marched to Spur 5, which is a large highway. Hundreds of cops formed a barrier but the protesters kept marching. Protesters were shouted at the cops, "We ain't scared," and "You don't protect us, so we won't do what you tell us!" Even when the cops were threatening to arrest everyone, the crowd remained unified and more people joined in. Because of the unity and determination of the crowd, the cops were unable to break up the protest. After rallying over 100 people, mostly African American, and some children even, the protesters marched through Third Ward, a historically African American neighborhood. Police started to show up on horses with batons, making threats and trying to scare the protesters, to which they chanted, "Whose streets, our streets!”

    At the intersection of Wheeler and Scott Street, which connects the University of Houston and Texas Southern University, the protesters occupied the square. The cops surrounded them, but they remained, absolutely fearless and unafraid of the batons, the guns, and the police-wagons. Ignoring the cops, they gave a few speeches in the intersection and shut down traffic. Then they marched to Texas Southern University, where they were met by dozens of students.

    TSU is a historically African American university and was a major site of activism during the Civil Rights Movement in Houston. Therefore, it was symbolically connecting the current struggle against police brutality to the struggle of the African American people in the Black Belt South.

    A student from TSU stated, “The turnout today demonstrates that Black people have had enough of the racist killer cops in this country. We are no longer afraid and we will take our community back. Their batons and guns are a tool to oppress us, and we will resist this oppression until we win the liberation of all Black people.”

    Read more News and Views from the Peoples Struggle at http://www.fightbacknews.org. You can write to us at [email protected]
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    Default Are Police Necessary?

    Are Police Necessary? / from TSJ teach-in / Labor Beat on YouTube



    Are Police Necessary?

    On YouTube at: https://youtu.be/SnVbympEFUQ

    + YouTube Video
    ERROR: If you can see this, then YouTube is down or you don't have Flash installed.


    Chicago’s Teachers for Social Justice held a teach-in on Sept. 24, 2016 on the topic of “Are Police Necessary?”, in part to prepare for and promote their upcoming Curriculum Fair on Nov. 19, focusing on the goals of de-funding policing and funding schools and communities.

    The teach-in critically examined the corrosive effects on school environments created by the knee-jerk response by the City of Chicago to turn to more policing in the schools as the solution to the crisis in education, a crisis created by a decaying political and economic system. Each day $4 million is spent on the Chicago police instead of on services which could reduce violence in the communities, such as mental health clinics and substance abuse treatment. There are more police in the public schools than librarians, social workers and counselors combined. Excerpts and interviews. Length: 8:30


    The Sept. 24 Teachers for Social Justice teach-in. Photo: Labor Beat


    Contribute today to the Labor Beat (Committee for Labor Access) fund drive. Info at:
    http://goo.gl/xV4ojb

    Produced by Labor Beat. Labor Beat is a CAN TV Community Partner. Labor Beat is a non-profit 501(c)(3) member of IBEW 1220. Views are those of the producer Labor Beat. For info: [email protected], www.laborbeat.org. 312-226-3330. For other Labor Beat videos, visit YouTube and search "Labor Beat". On Chicago CAN TV Channel 19, Thursdays 9:30 pm; Fridays 4:30 pm. Labor Beat has regular cable slots in Chicago, Evanston, Rockford, Urbana, IL; Philadelphia, PA; Princeton, NJ; and Rochester, NY.
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    Default US national anthem protests at sporting events continue to spread

    http://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2016.../anth-s28.html


    US national anthem protests at sporting events continue to spread

    By Alan Gilman

    28 September 2016

    Since San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick’s refusal to stand for the national anthem before National Football League (NFL) preseason games began in August, in protest of racial injustice and police brutality, his actions have continued to gain support throughout the first three weeks of the NFL’s regular season.

    Protests have spread throughout the league as well as to college and high school football fields, and to other sports throughout the country. The recent police killings of Terence Crutcher in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and Keith Lamont Scott in Charlotte, North Carolina, have contributed to the expansion of the protests.

    Last Sunday, protests at NFL games involved more than 40 players representing the Oakland Raiders, Denver Broncos, Miami Dolphins, Los Angeles Rams, Houston Texans, Philadelphia Eagles, San Diego Chargers, Jacksonville Jaguars, Tennessee Titans, Carolina Panthers, Washington Redskins, and San Francisco 49ers.

    In Sunday’s game in Seattle, Kaepernick was joined by seven other San Francisco teammates who either kneeled or stood with raised fists, up from five players the previous week. Their opponent, the Seattle Seahawks, for the third straight game linked arms together and stood as a demonstration of unity during the national anthem.

    In Charlotte, North Carolina, the Carolina Panthers hosted the Minnesota Vikings in the city where angry protests had been taking place in response to the police killing of Keith Lamont Scott.

    Carolina Panther star quarterback Cam Newton took the field during pregame warm-ups wearing a black T-shirt emblazoned with the Martin Luther King, Jr. quote, “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.” Earlier in the week Newton stated that Scott’s fatal shooting touched upon a “state of oppression in our community.”

    Last Sunday also saw Washington Redskins players for the first time protesting during the national anthem when four players raised their right fists before their game against the New York Giants.

    In the Indianapolis Colts game against the San Diego Chargers, Antonio Cromartie became the first Colts player to kneel during the anthem, while five Chargers stood with raised fists, up from two players the week before.

    In Jacksonville for the first time, four Jaguars players raised their fists during the national anthem, and their opponent the Tennessee Titans saw two more of their players joining three other teammates in raising their fists.

    At the Monday night game between the Atlanta Falcons and New Orleans Saints, after the anthem was played, players and coaches from both teams walked to the center of the field and formed a unity circle by holding hands.

    In the days leading up to the Monday night game, many players had expressed their intention of an anthem protest in response to the killings in Tulsa and Charlotte. The NFL, fearing such a protest during its nationally televised game, which took place during the Presidential Debate, orchestrated the show of “unity” in an attempt to diffuse the issue.

    Last weekend also saw college and high school football players and students following Kaepernick’s lead by engaging in a variety of symbolic protests during the playing of the national anthem.

    In most college games, the national anthem is played before the teams take the field. The Big Ten Conference, however, requires their teams to be present during the anthem.

    Consequently, players at several Big Ten schools engaged in anthem protests. At East Lansing, Michigan, Michigan State players Delton Williams, Kenney Lyke and Gabe Sherrod held up their right fists during the anthem before their game against Wisconsin.

    Several University of Michigan players also had their fists up before facing Penn State in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Among them were Khalid Hill, Mike McCray, Devin Bush, Elysee Mbem-Bosse and Jourdan Lewis.

    At Nebraska, players Michael Rose-Ivey, Daishon Neal and Mohamed Barry also kneeled before the Cornhuskers’ game at Northwestern.

    Even when players were absent during the anthem, students themselves engaged in protests. Before the University of North Carolina game against the University of Pittsburgh, at Chapel Hill, about 100 black and white students wearing black shirts remained seated with fists raised during the anthem and were joined as at least two UNC band members took a knee, one while raising a fist. Chapel Hill is about 140 miles northeast of Charlotte.

    At Baylor, some students in the stands kneeled during the anthem before the game against Oklahoma State.

    Earlier at Eastern Michigan University, chanting students marched on the field after last Friday’s night game against Wyoming. The students were protesting racist graffiti on the campus earlier in the week.

    High school players throughout the country, as well as entire teams (Seattle’s Garfield High School) have also participated in similar anthem protests.

    Many high school players have been threatened with suspension for such protests, but for the most part, authorities have had to back down.

    Junior quarterback Michael Oppong at Doherty Memorial High School in Worcester, Massachusetts, said on Twitter that he was told he would be suspended for one game after announcing he would kneel during the anthem before a recent game. It was a decision district officials quickly reversed.

    “(Oppong) did not violate any school rule when he peacefully and silently protested during the national anthem,” Worcester Superintendent Maureen Binienda said in a statement. “He exercised his constitutional rights.”

    Virtually all coaches and players at Wilson High, a public school in Camden, New Jersey, took a knee during the national anthem. Camden is a predominantly African-American community and one of New Jersey’s poorest.

    Wilson High coach Preston Brown said he did not ask his team to join him ahead of time, but all but two of his players did so. Afterward, Brown said that he wanted to call attention to social injustices and economic disparities.

    “I grew up in poverty, a lot of these kids are growing up in poverty,” Brown said. “There’s a lot of social injustices and economic disparities. There’s issues right here in our own community.”

    To prevent such protests from spreading to Camden’s Catholic Schools, the Catholic Schools Diocese of Camden issued a statement declaring, “We are not public institutions and free speech in all of its demonstrations, including protests, is not a guaranteed right,” and players who failed to “demonstrate appropriate respect” by choosing not to stand for the national anthem could face game and team suspensions.

    Similar protests by high school football players have taken place in hundreds of schools throughout the country.

    In women’s professional basketball, a number of players have also participated in anthem protests. New York Liberty guard Brittany Boyd sat on the bench with her head bowed in prayer during the national anthem before Saturday’s playoff game against the Phoenix Mercury.

    “I don’t want to stand up. I choose not to stand up and I sit down and pray,” the second-year guard said. “Colin [Kaepernick] and his message about social injustice going on in this country today is something I believe needs change.”

    Two Phoenix Mercury players who had previously declined to stand, Mistie Bass and Kelsey Bone, knelt through the anthem. Earlier last week, Bass and Bone had drawn national attention for their display before a playoff game against the Indiana Fever, while the entire Fever team also knelt, with the players locking arms.

    The willingness of athletes, professional and amateur, to defy the tradition of standing during the national anthem in order to protest police killings, is an expression of an increasing political opposition that is permeating masses of people. While these protests are limited by a racial view of police violence, a problem that effects the entire working class regardless of race or ethnicity, they serve as a healthy example of challenging and questioning the authority of the state.
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    Default URGENT Action Needed to Stop Ongoing Repression of Protestors in Charlotte, NC

    URGENT Action Needed to Stop Ongoing Repression of Protestors in Charlotte, NC


    S O L I D A R I T Y C E N T E R

    CharlotteUprising.com 9/29/2016

    * * * URGENT ACTION NEEDED * * *
    We demand an immediate end to
    repression of demonstrators in Charlotte!

    Call/Email CMPD, Mecklenburg County Sheriff,
    Mayor Roberts, Attorney General Roy Cooper,
    & Governor Pat McCrory

    Jail Liaison - Karla Gary
    Office phone: 980-314-5550
    email: [email protected]

    Public Information Manager - Anjanette Flowers Grube
    Office phone: 980-314-5170
    Cell phone: 704-634-5072
    email: [email protected]

    Mayor Jennifer Roberts
    Phone: 704-336-2241
    email: [email protected]

    Governor Pat McCrory
    Phone: 919-814-2000
    Phone: 919-733-4240
    email: [email protected]

    Attorney General Roy Cooper
    Phone: 919-716-6400
    [email protected]

    Since demonstrations began against the police murder of Keith Lamont Scott, police in Charlotte have been mass arresting protesters & legal observers, using chemical weapons, and violating their most basic rights.

    Jamil Gill (aka King Mills), who many around the country and the world know for his on the ground livestreams from the first nights of protest, has been a particular target of police repression ever since the protests began. He was arrested and issued an outrageous bond of $320,000, which the movement fought and reduced to a still obscene amount of $162,000.

    He was bonded out early in the day on September 28, and subsequently REARRESTED by police as he ate lunch! This is
    a clear attempt to intimidate and harass Gill, and an attempt
    by the state to silence and have a chilling effect on the rest of the movement.

    During demonstrations on September 21, police attacked the protests and killed 26-year-old Black man Justin Carr. Continuing their targeting Black and Brown people and a total lack of transparency by the CMPD, they are falsely accusing Raquan Borum for Justin's death.

    The police have continued to violate arrestees' legal rights by:

    Instructing the National Guard and police to blockade the jail (at least three times since the uprising began) to prevent the release of arrestees whose bond was paid

    Using bogus excuses like fire drills, 'suspicious packages,' and even characterizing our jail solidarity team gathering at the jail as a 'protest' to lock down the jail for hours

    Intentionally delaying the release of arrestees

    Not published arrestees' names online, impeding our ability to provide them legal support

    We need you to call and email the jail, Charlotte and state officials and demand that they stop violating arrestees' rights!

    Script for call or email:


    “Hello _______________.

    My name is _______________ and I am a resident of

    __________________. Can I speak to (See list above)

    I am calling to demand that you stop the repression of demonstrators in Charlotte.


    We demand an end to the attacks on Jamil Gill! Stop the arrests of all protesters!
    We demand that an independent investigation of the killing of Keith L. Scott and the Charlotte Mecklenburg Police Dept!
    We demand that you stop purposefully obstructing the release of arrestees!
    We demand that all the charges against those who have been arrested are dropped!

    Hands off #CharlotteUprising!

    The whole world is watching, and we won't stop until
    our demands are met and the people get justice!



    ___________________
    This message was sent to [email protected]

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    IAC Solidarity Center
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    Default Mother of Jesse Romero demands justice; video exposes LAPD lies

    Mother of Jesse Romero demands justice; video exposes LAPD lies



    By staff

    Los Angeles, CA - In front of media cameras and surrounded by family and supporters, Teresa Dominguez, the mother of Jesse Romero, demanded justice for her son. The Oct. 6 press conference announced the filing of a government claim against the City of Los Angeles and the LAPD for the killing of Romero. Lawyer Humberto Guizar pointed out that recently released videos contradict the police version of the killing. He blasted the LAPD for lying, saying that were was no way the police version can be truthful.

    Jesse Romero, 14 years old, was killed by officers of the LAPD Hollenbeck station on Aug. 9 under the pretext that he was writing on a wall. After chasing him, the cops falsely claimed that he pointed a gun and that they had to shoot to kill him. Videos released by LA Weekly, Democracy Now and others shown on social media contradict the LAPD version of the shooting. The videos show Jesse down on a side walk bleeding and dying and the alleged gun far way on other side of a metal wrought iron fence. A witness states that Jesse ran and threw away the old gun over the fence and was shot and killed moments later. The mother is demanding justice for Jesse Romero, and this claim is the initial step toward a formal lawsuit.

    Four other young men have been killed in Boyle Heights by LAPD since Feb. 6 and one other by ELA sheriffs.

    Chicano activist Carlos Montes, of Centro CSO, introduced the speakers, who included Black Lives Matter member Michael Williams, who expressed solidarity and called for the firing of Chief Beck. Josefina Rizo, the mother of Jose Mendez, 16 years old and killed by LAPD Feb. 6, expressed support for Teresa Dominguez and called for justice for all the families and prosecution of the LAPD.

    fSol Marquez, representing Centro CSO spoke about many other police killings of young Chicanos and the demand to District Attorney Jackie Lacey to prosecute the killer cops. She pointed out that Centro CSO and the families organized a call in day to D.A. Lacey demanding that she prosecutes the police.

    Damian Ramirez with Young Survivors spoke about the epidemic of killings nationwide of Black and Brown youth across the U.S. and the need to unite to stop police killings. Also present was Obdulio Olivas father of Carlos, 19, killed by LA sheriffs in East LA in 2013 and Blanca Valdez, whose son Arturo was killed by LAPD in April in Boyle Heights.

    Jesse Romero attended local schools in Boyle heights. He graduated from 2nd Street School, attended Hollenbeck Middle School, and Mendez High School. Jesse is the latest police killing of Chicano youth in Boyle Heights.

    Also present and supporting the event were Maria Banda, whose son was shot 14 times by LAPD in Boyle Heights and sent to jail for 15 years; Black Lives Matter LA; Centro CSO; Young Survivors-Carmelo Castaneda, and students from ELAC Mecha.

    Centro CSO invites everyone to attend their upcoming meeting on Oct. 19, at 6:30 at the Benjamin Franklin Library in Boyle Heights.
    Read more News and Views from the Peoples Struggle at http://www.fightbacknews.org. You can write to us at [email protected]
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    Default Billionaires back Black Lives Matter

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    Default Parents threatened with arrest after children protest anthem

    Parents threatened with arrest after children protest anthem


    These students took a knee to protest violence against Black youth. Now they’re being punished.


    Colin Kaepernick kneeling in protest.

    Demand the executive board revoke it’s unjust punishment of these children, their parents, and coaches.

    TAKE ACTION


    Dear Chris,

    The young 11 and 12-year-boys of the Beaumont Bulls football team have been harshly punished for silently protesting the national anthem.1

    After these kids knelt during the anthem to protest police violence against Black youth, their local executive board canceled their entire football season, suspended the coaching staff, and threatened to arrest their parents if they attended any future games, practices or events.

    This is the most disturbing punishment of a national anthem protest yet. Canceling these kids’ entire season and threatening to have their parents arrested is a gross response to a silent protest asking for basic rights and dignity.The executive board that handed down this punishment and threatened these families with police violence for attending their children’s football events must be held accountable.

    Demand the executive board immediately reinstate the Beaumont Bulls coaching staff, apologize to the boys and their parents, and allow them to finish their season.

    Police brutality, wrongful arrests and racial violence plague these children in their town of Beaumont, Texas. Within days of Colin Kaepernick’s protest, the team’s coaching staff, privately discussed the possibility of them taking a knee before their next game, before ultimately deciding against it. The coaches didn't want to impose anything on the players. To their surprise, though, the young boys came to them and told them they wanted to take a knee. The shooting deaths of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile at the hands of police just two months prior had deeply bothered the young students.

    For these young Black kids the plight of injustice in America is their own. Instead of supporting the boys and their protests, their executive board and league officials abandoned them. The board has decided to strip these kids of the team that they love to punish them for asking for basic rights and dignities. This is about the board reinforcing that police violence in our communities doesn’t matter, that our issues aren’t important and that speaking on them makes you subject to punishment.

    For these kids, playing on a football team together is likely one of the few places they can step away from the racial injustices they face everyday and just be themselves. But now, that has been unjustly taken away from them in an attempt to deprive them of their dignity and humanity.

    These kids are brave for refusing to give in to the executive board and for standing against injustice. We need to support the fight of these children and show them that their protest is heard.

    Demand the executive board immediately reinstate the Beaumont Bulls coaching staff, apologize to the boys and their parents, and allow them to finish their season.

    Until justice is real,

    --Brandi, Rashad, Arisha, Anika, Evan, Bernard, Jade, Corina and the rest of the Color Of Change team.

    References:

    1. "KING: After taking a knee, young boys saw their football coach suspended then their whole season canceled," RawStory, 10-17-2016
    http://act.colorofchange.org/go/6959....872082.lkvzvy


    Color Of Change is building a movement to elevate the voices of Black folks and our allies, and win real social and political change. Help keep our movement strong.

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  21. #19
    Join Date Mar 2008
    Location traveling (U.S.)
    Posts 12,908
    Rep Power 60

    Default Ben & Jerry's: Do Palestinian human rights matter?

    Ben & Jerry's: Do Palestinian human rights matter?



    Vermonters for a Just Peace
    in Palestine/Israel

    Ben & Jerry's: Do Palestinian human rights matter?


    Vermonters for a Just Peace in Palestine/Israel commends Ben & Jerry's for taking the brave step of aligning the company with the Black Lives Matter movement in a statement posted October 6th 2016. But the company continues to miss opportunities to take specific actions to show that it respects the lives of Palestinian refugees and Palestinians living under occupation.

    The statement continues: "We’ve come to understand that to be silent about the violence and threats to the lives and well-being of Black people is to be complicit in that violence and those threats." Meanwhile we’ve been saying to Ben & Jerry's for 4 years now - that to be silent about the occupation of Palestine, which daily humiliates and brutalizes 4 million Palestinians, is to be complicit in those crimes. And sales of Ben & Jerry's in settlements actively support the occupation.



    Many activists in the 'Black Lives Matter' movement identify their struggle with the struggle for human rights of Palestinians who are denied basic freedoms by the Israeli occupation (When I see them I see us). Ben & Jerry's statement says "we have a moral obligation to take a stand now for justice and for Black lives." And yet by failing to speak out against the occupation they have shown little interest in justice for Palestinians. The company continues to sell ice cream in illegal Jewish-only settlements and to send ice cream treats to Israeli soldiers of the occupation forces.

    Ben & Jerry's statement says "All lives do matter. But all lives will not matter until Black lives matter." As the Black Lives Matter movement has made perfectly clear, all lives include oppressed Palestinians as well as oppressed people of color in the US.



    Ben & Jerry’s could take immediate constructive steps by speaking out against the occupation and by stopping sales of their ice cream in the settlements. But Palestinians' lives apparently do not matter enough.

    What to do: Write an email to Ben & Jerry's Global Director of Social Mission Rob Michalak, CEO Jostein Solheim, Board Chair Jeff Furman and Ben and Jerry asking them to put Ben & Jerry's on record: "We will not do business in a country that denies Palestinians their basic human rights.

    Vermonters for a Just Peace in Palestine/Israel [email protected]
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  22. #20
    Join Date Mar 2008
    Location traveling (U.S.)
    Posts 12,908
    Rep Power 60

    Default Progressive Congress Condemns Incident in which African-American Student in Mississip

    Progressive Congress Condemns Incident in which African-American Student in Mississippi Had Noose Put Around His Neck

    Website: www.progressivecongress.org

    Facebook: www.facebook.com/ProgressiveCongress

    Twitter: www.twitter.com/ProgCongress

    Dear Chris,

    We wanted to share our statement with our supporters regarding the horrific incident that took place at Stone High School in Mississippi.

    Our full statement is included below.

    -- Olivia Alperstein
    Policy and Communications Associate
    Progressive Congress

    ***FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE***

    Press Contact

    Olivia Alperstein

    [email protected]

    October 26, 2016


    Progressive Congress Condemns Incident in which African-American Student in Mississippi Had Noose Put Around His Neck

    Progressive Congress was appalled to learn that on October 13, an African-American student at Stone High School in Mississippi had a noose placed and then tightened around his neck by a group of white students. Mississippi has a fraught history of racism and mistreatment of black people that has continues to affect its educational institutions today. Progressive Congress joins the president of the Mississippi N.A.A.C.P. in urging federal authorities to fully investigate this heinous incident. This is not the only school in Mississippi that has dealt with recent incidents that harken back to a dark and dangerous time in the state’s past. Progressive Congress urges school officials to use the context of an educational setting to make this teachable moment for all students and educators alike. Tolerance and acceptance, like racism, can be taught, and high school is a critical time for young adults learning to navigate an adult world.

    “Today’s political environment has created a climate of hatred that exacerbates incidents like this,” stated Dr. Gabriela Lemus, President of Progressive Congress. “How is it that an African-American high school student can be attacked by his peers who wrap a noose tightly around his neck and there is little response from school officials? How is it that the Stone County Sheriff's Department told the youth’s parents that it is better to not seek charges? We must ask ourselves what lessons we are teaching young people and what role educators can play to address bigotry in all its forms. I urge federal investigators to look into this challenging situation and help this divided community dialogue and heal.”

    The symbolism of a noose and the act of mock lynching serve as a painful reminder that Mississippi still has not escaped its past, as a former slave state, a supporter of the Confederacy, and as a state in which government officials joined with white supremacists in suppressing the rights of black people. Decades ago during the Civil Rights Movement, white government officials enabled and even participated in a reign of terror to suppress the right of free black people to be treated as human beings, to attend the same schools, restaurants, and other public spaces as white people, and to vote. Mississippi’s history includes James Meredith, the first black person to successfully integrate an all-white university, as well as Emmett Till, who was lynched at only fourteen years old, supposedly for flirting with a white woman. Mississippi still contends with this complex history today, where it is the only state to still include the Confederate flag as part of the official state flag. Tightening a noose around a student’s neck is an act of racism that must be dealt with in the context of this history, but also in the context of shaping a better future for all of Mississippi’s residents.

    School officials and the Mississippi government have the opportunity to condemn such acts and teach students the value of tolerance and acceptance rather than hate.

    ###






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