Thread: Discussion on Full Automation and its Social Consequences

Results 41 to 47 of 47

  1. #41
    Join Date Mar 2008
    Location traveling (U.S.)
    Posts 14,960
    Rep Power 63

    Default Death By A Thousand Clicks: Leading Boston Doctors Decry Electronic Medical Records

    [LaborTech] Death By A Thousand Clicks: Leading Boston Doctors Decry Electronic Medical Records


    Death By A Thousand Clicks: Leading Boston Doctors Decry Electronic Medical Records
    http://www.wbur.org/commonhealth/201...m_term=nprnews

    May 12, 2017By Drs. John Levinson, Bruce H. Price and Vikas Saini

    Share
    (John Raoux/AP)



    It happens every day, in exam rooms across the country, something that would have been unthinkable 20 years ago: Doctors and nurses turn away from their patients and focus their attention elsewhere — on their computer screens.

    By the time the doctor can finally turn back to her patient, she will have spent close to half of the appointment serving not the needs of her patient, but of the electronic medical record.

    Electronic medical records, or EMRs, were supposed to improve the quality, safety and efficiency of health care, and provide instant access to vital patient information.

    Instead, EMRs have become the bane of doctors and nurses everywhere. They are the medical equivalent of texting while driving, sucking the soul out of the practice of medicine while failing to improve care.

    To fix them, hospital administrators and clinicians need to work together to demand better products from EMR manufacturers and to urge government to relax several provisions of the HITECH Act, the 2009 law that spawned many of the problems with EMRs.

    How did technology that has increased efficiency in every other industry become such a drag on health care? For starters, people who take care of patients did not design or choose these systems. They were foisted upon us.

    Doctors and nurses know that good diagnosis and treatment requires listening attentively to their patients. They spend years learning to parse the clues that patients offer, both the physiological and personal, in order to provide the right care.

    The sound of medicine is not the click of a mouse. It is the human voice. Let’s bring it back.
    To do this well takes time and undivided attention.

    Making sense of a patient’s blood panel means knowing the patient’s work and eating habits, and where he or she may have traveled. We need to know if the patient is experiencing a traumatic life event, like the death of a parent or domestic abuse, in order to interpret an elevated blood pressure.

    Instead of making this easier, most EMRs create extra work. A lot of extra work, thanks to endless prompts with multiple choice answers that hardly ever fit the facts and that demand click after click to get anything done.

    Want to order a simple test? That requires getting through multiple prompts. Need to write a prescription -- an exercise that used to take less than 15 seconds? Another set of clicks.

    Typing, filing, mailing results and placing referrals all used to be done by assistants. Now, EMRs put that burden on clinicians, and we must do it during office visits, or “encounters,” as EMRs call them. And when the wrong button is clicked, the wrong test or drug is ordered, or it does not go through at all, delaying medical care.

    It’s death by a thousand clicks, and it happens every day.

    We are frustrated by EMRs because they pull us away from our patients. We are driven mad by the fact that EMRs in different locations do not talk to each other. And we think it’s just wrong that much of the EMR’s busywork is about optimizing billing for the hospital.

    Who is to blame? Start with EMR manufacturers, who lobbied Congress to require every hospital and doctor’s office to install an EMR system; hospital administrators who bought technology that conveniently pushed billing duties onto doctors and nurses; and federal regulators, who imposed on EMRs numerous quality metric requirements that do nothing to improve care.

    We do not want to go backward. We believe that computing is essential to the future of medicine. We simply want all EMRs to live up to their promise of improving care and making patient information readily available.

    Thousands of doctors in Boston and across the country are expressing the same frustration, through gritted teeth, between exasperated sighs, and in resignation letters. EMRs are driving too many health care providers to hang up their scrubs and white coats in search of work that is less infuriating and more fulfilling.

    As we continue to debate how our country will finance an equitable health care system for all, we need a long-term strategy to address this crisis in health care delivery.

    The public and private institutions of this city have long and illustrious histories of leadership in health care. Now is the time to embrace that tradition and do something about EMRs. We plan to hold town hall meetings to give providers, patients and community members a chance to discuss how to address the problems of EMRs. We invite executives and administrators from all our hospital systems to participate.

    The sound of medicine is not the click of a mouse. It is the human voice. Let’s bring it back, for the sake of our patients’ health and our own sanity.

    John Levinson, MD, PhD, is a cardiologist and internist at Massachusetts General Hospital, where he served as vice president of IT for MGH physicians from 1994-2004.

    Bruce H. Price, MD, is chief of the Department of Neurology at McLean Hospital, associate neurologist at Massachusetts General Hospital and associate professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School.

    Vikas Saini, MD, is a cardiologist, the president of the Lown Institute and co-chair of the Right Care Alliance, a clinician and patient led health care reform movement.

    --
    You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "LaborTech" group.
    To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to [email protected].
    To post to this group, send email to [email protected].
    Visit this group at https://groups.google.com/group/labortech.
    For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
  2. #42
    Join Date Mar 2008
    Location traveling (U.S.)
    Posts 14,960
    Rep Power 63

    Default Beyond Basic Income: Claiming Our Right to Govern Technology

    Beyond Basic Income: Claiming Our Right to Govern Technology



    Annette Bernhardt points to a contradiction that poses a serious challenge to the progressive movement - especially to the labor movement - and goes to the heart of the concept of "just transition". She says, "One common characteristic of universal basic income advocates, and indeed progressives and labor more generally, is a near-fatalistic acceptance of the current path of technological development. It is a gaping hole in discussions about the future of work: either we are sticking our heads in the sand and avoiding the topic altogether, or we’re accepting automation as inevitable and therefore immediately ratcheting to basic income as the solution. For a movement that routinely challenges the market discipline of capitalism, this constitutes a striking retreat. To state the obvious, humans are the creators of new technology and can shape the path it takes (at least for now). Automation and displacement are not the only possible outcome. A truly progressive agenda around the future of work should therefore add control over technology into the mix: control over which technologies are developed, to what ends, and how they are incorporated into the workplace. " [More]


    Your contribution will be greatly appreciated.

    Donate


    This is a low-volume email list operated by US Labor Against the War

    1030 15th St, NW #153 | Washington DC 20005 | 202-521-5265 | Contact USLAW

    Sent via ActionNetwork.org. To update your email address or to stop receiving emails from U.S. Labor Against the War (USLAW), please click here.
  3. #43
    Join Date Mar 2008
    Location traveling (U.S.)
    Posts 14,960
    Rep Power 63

    Default Researchers Say New Solar Paint Could Produce Energy

    https://www.courthousenews.com/resea...roduce-energy/

    HOME
    COLUMNS
    BACK ISSUES
    .

    Search

    Researchers Say New Solar Paint Could Produce Energy

    SEAN DUFFYFacebookTwitterGoogle+Email June 15, 2017

    (CN) — Australian researchers say they have developed a solar paint that absorbs water vapor and sunlight, generating clean hydrogen energy in a process that offers a potentially limitless source of power.

    The paint features a new compound that acts like silica gel, a drying agent used in sachets to absorb moisture and keep food fresh.

    The team from RMIT University in Australia said Wednesday in the journal “ACS Nano” that the new material, synthetic molybdenum-sulfide, also functions as a semiconductor and catalyzes the splitting of water atoms into oxygen and hydrogen.

    “We found that mixing the compound with titanium oxide particles leads to a sunlight-absorbing paint that produces hydrogen fuel from solar energy and moist air,” lead author Torben Daeneke said.

    As titanium oxide is a common ingredient in paint, the new material could convert a brick wall into fuel production real estate.

    “Our new development has a big range of advantages,” Daeneke said. “There’s no need for clean or filtered water to feed the system. Any place that has water vapor in the air, even remote areas far from water, can produce fuel.”

    Daeneke’s colleague, Kourosh Kalantar-zadeh, said hydrogen could be used in fuel cells as well as conventional combustion engines.

    “This system can also be used in very dry but hot climates near oceans,” said Kalantar-zadeh. “The seawater is evaporated by the hot sunlight and the vapor can then be absorbed to produce fuel. This is an extraordinary concept: making fuel from the sun and water vapor in the air.”

    Related
    Nightly Brief
    June 15, 2017
    In "nightly brief"
    German Scientists Test 'Artificial Sun'
    March 23, 2017
    In "International"
    'Abundant' Water Ice Found in Asteroid Belt
    December 15, 2016
    In "Science"
    CNS Trends

    Casino Sued for Downgrading Jackpot to Steak Dinner Casino Sued for Downgrading Jackpot to Steak Dinner
    Designers of Freedom Tower Hit With Copyright Action Designers of Freedom Tower Hit With Copyright Action
    Radioactive Waste Still Flooding Columbia River, EPA Says Radioactive Waste Still Flooding Columbia River, EPA Says
    Priest’s Cold-Case Murder Trial Delayed Priest’s Cold-Case Murder Trial Delayed
    Double Boondoggle Alleged Under Shadow of El Chapo’s Drug Cartel Double Boondoggle Alleged Under Shadow of El Chapo’s Drug Cartel
    White Professor Fired From Black College Gets $4.9 Million White Professor Fired From Black College Gets $4.9 Million
    Man Charged in Turkish-Protest Assault Denied Bail Man Charged in Turkish-Protest Assault Denied Bail
    Illinois High Court Rejects ‘Occupy’ Free-Assembly Claim Illinois High Court Rejects ‘Occupy’ Free-Assembly Claim
    Researchers Say New Solar Paint Could Produce Energy Researchers Say New Solar Paint Could Produce Energy
    CNS Feed


    Return To Top
    Columns Law National Regional International About Us Terms of Use Privacy Policy
    Facebook
    Twitter
    Google+
    Email
  4. #44
    Join Date Mar 2008
    Location traveling (U.S.)
    Posts 14,960
    Rep Power 63

    Default

    Are we ready for driverless cars _ Lauren Isaac _ TEDxSacramento

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kSmTF6KoUb8

    + YouTube Video
    ERROR: If you can see this, then YouTube is down or you don't have Flash installed.



    Chris Urmson - How a driverless car sees the road

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tiwVMrTLUWg

    + YouTube Video
    ERROR: If you can see this, then YouTube is down or you don't have Flash installed.
  5. #45
    Join Date Mar 2008
    Location traveling (U.S.)
    Posts 14,960
    Rep Power 63

    Default 100x faster, 10x cheaper: 3D metal printing is about to go mainstream

    http://newatlas.com/desktop-metal-3d...default-widget


    100x faster, 10x cheaper: 3D metal printing is about to go mainstream

    Loz Blain Loz Blain July 26, 2017


    Sintering Multiple Parts – Desktop Metal’s Studio System includes a fully-automated, office-friendly sintering furnace with fast cycle times and a peak temperature of 1400°C, allowing for the sintering of a wide variety of materials. (Credit: Desktop Metal)

    VIEW GALLERY - 14 IMAGES

    Desktop Metal – remember the name. This Massachussetts company is preparing to turn manufacturing on its head, with a 3D metal printing system that's so much faster, safer and cheaper than existing systems that it's going to compete with traditional mass manufacturing processes.

    ADVERTISING

    Complex metal propeller, coarsely prototyped in the Desktop Metal studio system DM Co-Founders: Desktop Metal co-founders (front left to right: CEO Ric Fulop, A. John Hart, Jonah Myerberg; standing left to right: Yet Ming-Chiang, Chris Schuh, Ely Sachs, Rick Chin) Desktop Metal Studio system: massively more affordable, office-safe and practical than an equivalent laser system
    We've been hearing for years now about 3D printing and how it's going to revolutionize manufacturing. As yet, though, it's still on the periphery.

    Plenty of design studios and even home users run desktop printers, but the only affordable printing materials are cheap ABS plastics. And at the other end of the market, while organizations like NASA and Boeing are getting valuable use out of laser-melted metal printing, it's a very slow and expensive process that doesn't seem to scale well.

    But a very exciting company out of Massachusetts, headed by some of the guys who came up with the idea of additive manufacture in the first place, believes it's got the technology and the machinery to boost 3D printing into the big time, for real.

    Desktop Metal

    Desktop Metal is an engineering-driven startup whose founders include several MIT professors, and Emanuel Sachs, who has patents in 3D printing dating back to the dawn of the field in 1989.

    The company has raised a ton of money in the last few months, including some US$115 million in a recent Series D round that brings total equity investments up over US$210 million. That money has come from big players, too, including Google Ventures.

    The hype is real. And if Desktop Metal delivers on its promises – that it can make reliable metal printing up to 100 times faster, with 10 times cheaper initial costs and 20 times cheaper materials costs than existing laser technologies, using a much wider range of alloys – these machines might be the tipping point for large scale 3D manufacturing.

    The company is putting forward two systems: a studio system aimed at rapid, cheap metal prototyping for engineering groups, and a production system for mass manufacture.



    The Studio System: Rapid prototyping

    Coming in at some 10 times cheaper than equivalent laser systems, Desktop Metal's Studio machines are also a ton more practical to have in an office. Without hazardous (and sometimes explosive) metal powders to deal with, or dangerous lasers, you can stick them pretty much anywhere without needing to install ventilation or make your workers wear respirators.

    Indeed, having the Studio system around is much more like a regular old FDM (fused deposition modeling) ABS plastic printer than any other metal printing machine. It's very low maintenance and requires no special support equipment or staff.

    The metals arrive in rod form, bound to a polymer binding agent and shipped in cartridges. But there's a ton of metal options – basically anything you can use in a Metal Injection Molding (MIM) system. That includes 4140 chromoly steel, aluminum, copper, bronze, a range of stainless steels, Hiperco 50 magnetic, titanium, and more than 200 other alloys.



    The Studio printer runs around and prints parts into layers of bound metal. The parts then go into a de-binding bath that removes a good portion of the binding polymer, and then the parts go into a sintering furnace.

    The furnace is the special sauce in the Desktop Metal process. It uses a combination of regular heating elements and microwave heating to bring the part up to a temperature just below its melting point, where the binding agent burns off and the metal particles within fuse to their neighbors to produce a highly dense, sintered metal.



    Timing and temperature are managed automatically by the system, depending on the design and the metals you've used. Parts also shrink up to 15 percent during the debinding and sintering process – but again, that's all automatically managed by the system. All you need to do is feed in the end design and all that business is handled.

    At the end of the process, you basically poke out the support sections with a screwdriver. They're not welded to the part, and in many cases can be broken off by hand.

    Depending on the nature of the part, it might be necessary to do some post-print surface finishing like sanding or bead blasting to smooth out the layered surfaces, but effectively you're left with a prototype part, produced quickly, in the production material and ready for testing. And parts are around 99.8 percent dense, which is huge. They're very mechanically tough.



    The Studio system makes rapid, affordable metal prototyping much more accessible than ever before, using a huge range of cheap, safe and easily handled materials and producing high-quality parts that can be tested properly. The entire integrated system and associated software retails for US$120,000, where an equivalent laser system will run you more than US$1 million – and that doesn't take into account the safety and materials handling overheads the laser systems require.

    That's a massive step forward in prototyping, and the Studio system will begin shipping this year. But the production system, which will debut in 2018, is where the real revolution could lie.



    The Production System: Mass manufacture

    The production system is built for speed, to a degree that has never been seen before. Faster than machining, casting, forging or any other technique, each production printer can produce up to an incredible 500 cubic inches of complex parts per hour. That's 100 times quicker than a laser-based alternative, with zero tooling.

    Indeed, it prints faster than those hybrid microwave furnaces can sinter. To reach the full production speed, you'll need up to four furnaces per printer.

    The Production printers use a different process called Single Pass Jetting, explained in the video below.

    + https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Pk7Mq7ESwI" title="View this video at YouTube in a new window or tab" target="_blank">YouTube Video
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Pk7Mq7ESwI"> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Pk7Mq7ESwI" /> ERROR: If you can see this, then YouTube is down or you don't have Flash installed.


    Instead of bound metal rod cartridges like the Studio printer uses, the Production machines use powders, which are bonded together during printing by spray-jetted droplets of a binder solution. They use regular, low-cost, easily available MIM powders. That's another huge advantage over laser machines, which need expensive powders with very precise particle sizes. Material costs here will be up to 20 times lower.

    This, combined with the lack of tooling and job setup costs, can bring 3D printed metal parts down cheap enough to compete with traditional manufacturing processes for the first time.

    The rest of the process – de-binding and sintering – looks much the same as the Studio system. Print resolution is as fine as 50 microns, roughly the width of a human hair. And while no final pricing has been given yet on the full system, each printer will retail for around US$360,000.

    It's hard to overstate what a leap forward the Desktop Metal system represents. It's orders of magnitude faster than the current state of the art. It uses vastly cheaper materials that already exist in commercial quantities thanks to Metal Injection Molding. And the printers themselves are massively cheaper, too.

    It's safe, simple and highly automated, and it's designed to make 3D printing as cost-effective as traditional manufacturing. It could be the tipping point that opens the door to radical 3D-printed design elements in mass market products.

    This could be huge, folks. Hold on tight!

    More information: Desktop Metal

    Separable Supports Removal (hand) – Proprietary Separable Supports make it possible to remove support structures by hand. DM Studio System Cartridges – Easily swappable print cartridges make for safe, fast material changes. Cast side by side – (right) A yoke for a brake assembly produced with the DM Studio System as a replacement part for heavy machinery and (left) the original part that was cast and machined. Desktop Metal production system. Each printer (left) runs so fast it needs up to four hybrid furnaces for sintering

    VIEW GALLERY - 14 IMAGES


    UPGRADE TO NEW ATLAS PLUS

    More than 1,500 New Atlas Plus subscribers directly support our journalism, and get access to our premium ad-free site and email newsletter. Join them for just US$19 a year.

    UPGRADE
    TAGS #3D PRINTERS #3D PRINTING #INDUSTRIAL DESIGN #MANUFACTURING
    SHARE THIS ARTICLE
    SHOW 12 COMMENTS


    COPYRIGHT © GIZMAG PTY LTD 2017
    TWITTER
    FACEBOOK
    RSS
    FLIPBOARD
    GIZMAG IS NOW NEW ATLAS
  6. #46
    Join Date Sep 2010
    Location United States
    Posts 1,869
    Rep Power 16

    Default

    [LaborTech] Death By A Thousand Clicks: Leading Boston Doctors Decry Electronic Medical Records


    Death By A Thousand Clicks: Leading Boston Doctors Decry Electronic Medical Records
    http://www.wbur.org/commonhealth/201...m_term=nprnews

    May 12, 2017By Drs. John Levinson, Bruce H. Price and Vikas Saini

    Share
    (John Raoux/AP)





    It happens every day, in exam rooms across the country, something that would have been unthinkable 20 years ago: Doctors and nurses turn away from their patients and focus their attention elsewhere — on their computer screens.

    By the time the doctor can finally turn back to her patient, she will have spent close to half of the appointment serving not the needs of her patient, but of the electronic medical record.


    This sounds a lot like Marx's constant capital (the computer EMR) increasing while variable capital (drs and nurses) decreases, resulting in a loss of value and cheapening of health care (less labor time contained in the product.)

    The hospital is probably forced to use the technology in order to keep up with its competition, just as Marx predicted. So, the health industry becomes more monopolized, its gross profits are up, but the rates of profit falling. At some point patients won't be talking to drs but only answering questions from a robot.

    So, do drs and nurses lose any "value?" They still provide a use-value, but as the rate of profit continues to fall, there must be a tendency to move to a non-profit or community owned health system as the system produces more and more use-value relative to exchange-value.

    When the OP talks about "full automation" I think that can only mean full, automated production of commodities, which would result in a zero profit rate for capital. Humans will no longer produce commodities, but only human "products."
  7. #47
    Join Date Mar 2008
    Location traveling (U.S.)
    Posts 14,960
    Rep Power 63

    Default Portable 3D printer builds a tiny house for a tiny price

    http://newatlas.com/apis-cor-3d-prin...default-widget


    3D PRINTING

    Portable 3D printer builds a tiny house for a tiny price

    Adam Williams Adam Williams March 3, 2017


    The total cost for the project came in at just US$10,134, not including furniture or appliances (Credit: Apis Cor)

    VIEW GALLERY - 14 IMAGES

    Though 3D-printed architecture is still in its relative infancy, we're already at the point that printing a basic house is feasible. 3D-printing firm Apis Cor, in collaboration with development firm PIK, recently showed off the portable 3D printer it has developed by using it to build a basic structure of a 38-sq-m (409-sq-ft) home.

    Inside the 3D-printed house Apis Cor's 3D printer is a mobile unit and can be delivered to a site on the back of a truck

    The printing process itself is similar to the other 3D-printed architecture we've reported on and involves extruding cement in layers Once the project was complete, they got the printer out of the house with a crane before putting the roof in place



    The prototype home was built in Russia starting last December (the weather was so cold they had to erect a tent to keep the cement mixture from freezing) and was just recently finished. Its roughly circular shape was chosen to highlight the tech's versatility, and though modest inside, it looks like a usable small home for one or two people.

    The actual printing process took 24 hours and is very similar to the other 3D-printed architecture projects we've reported on. Put simply, the 3D printer, which looks like a small crane, extrudes cement out of a nozzle in layer after layer to create a structure.

    The machine didn't do all the work, though. The roof, insulation, windows, and other components were all added later by humans. The total cost for the project came in at just US$10,134, not including furniture or appliances.



    We've already reported on a 3D-printed office, a castle, and even a Chinese firm that managed to print 10 houses in a day, but each of those projects required large 3D-printers, multiple units working together, or were printed in a factory in several individual pieces before being transported to the building site.

    However, Apis Cor's project was built on-site with just one portable printer. Measuring a maximum height of 3.1 m (10 ft) and a maximum length of 5 m (16.4 ft), the printer weighs 2 tons (1,814 kg) and can be transported to a building site on the back of a truck like any other piece of heavy machinery. The firm offers its 3D-printer for sale or rent, though we've no word on how much it costs.

    While impressive, the march of progress in 3D-printed architecture raises concerns for construction workers. We can't see any 3D printer replacing a skilled craftsman, but they probably will be used in place of unskilled workers for smaller jobs. Great news if you're the owner of a firm looking to save time and money, but if you're a laborer ... not so much.

    Check out the video to see some more information on the project.

    Source: Apis Cor

    + YouTube Video
    ERROR: If you can see this, then YouTube is down or you don't have Flash installed.


    The home's roof was added later by humans Finishing the 3D-printed house Painting the 3D-printed house Painting the 3D-printed house

    VIEW GALLERY - 14 IMAGES
    UPGRADE TO NEW ATLAS PLUS

    Our new premium service is backed by 15 years of experience covering science, technology and innovation. New Atlas Plus delivers a visual experience that is cleaner, faster loading and ad free. Join the growing list of Plus subscribers for just US$19 a year.



    COPYRIGHT © GIZMAG PTY LTD 2017
    TWITTER
    FACEBOOK
    RSS
    FLIPBOARD
    GIZMAG IS NOW NEW ATLAS

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 29th November 2015, 02:20
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 29th November 2015, 02:16
  3. Nearly full automation at Lego plant: What does it mean?
    By Nothing Human Is Alien in forum Theory
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 4th October 2011, 11:06
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10th January 2009, 04:56
  5. A proper discussion on socialism and social reform - a link
    By Anarcho in forum Opposing Ideologies
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 1st October 2002, 12:30

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Website Security Test