Thread: Imperialism and the Saudi-led assault on Yemen

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    Default Imperialism and the Saudi-led assault on Yemen

    Imperialism and the Saudi-led assault on Yemen

    The national democratic Houthi uprising strengthens the camp of resistance in the Middle East



    By staff

    Saudi Arabia's vicious assault on the people of Yemen continues nearly one year after its initiation - and there's no obvious end in sight. In March 2015, a Saudi-led military coalition largely made up of the other reactionary monarchies of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) launched a military intervention in Yemen. Called Operation Decisive Storm, this intervention began as a response to the overthrow of Yemen's corrupt government by the popular Houthi insurgency.

    To date, Operation Decisive Storm has left over 2800 Yemeni civilians - many of them children - dead, and displaced thousands. For all the carnage and brutality, though, Saudi Arabia's intervention comes from a place of weakness, not strength. And in the face of mass popular resistance and widespread international opposition, the operation has fared poorly for Saudi Arabia and its imperialist backers.

    As monopoly capitalism plunges the world deeper into crisis, the U.S. and its partners like Saudi Arabia lash out in increasingly brutal ways to maintain control of the oil-rich region and these actions spark fierce resistance by the anti-imperialist forces in the Middle East. The Houthi uprising in Yemen is part of this camp of resistance and the Saudi-led military intervention speaks to the eroding rule of imperialism in the region.

    Yemen's revolutionary history

    Yemen has a vibrant history of resistance to foreign domination. Because of its strategic location in the Gulf of Aden, Yemen drew the attention of both the British and Ottoman empires, which colonized and divided it into a north and south territory in 1904. After the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire following World War I, Britain continued to exercise control over Yemen through corrupt rulers and sultanates – not unlike the U.S.'s relationship to the Gulf monarchies today. However, in 1962, nationalist forces in the northern Yemen, inspired and supported by Gamal Abdel Nasser's anti-colonial government in Egypt, overthrew the British and Saudi-backed monarchy and proclaimed the Yemen Arab Republic in its place.

    This rebellion spread to southern Yemen in 1963, when communists and nationalists united to form the National Liberation Front of Yemen (NLF) and launched an armed struggle for liberation. Facing defeat, Britain granted independence to South Yemen in 1964 and withdrew from the country entirely two years later. The new NLF government immediately proclaimed itself the People's Democratic Republic of Yemen (PDRY) in 1970, aligned with the Soviet Union and set itself the goal of building socialism.

    For the next 20 years, Yemen remained divided – a capitalist north and a national democratic, leftist south – until the PDRY agreed to a unification proposal in 1990. For the vast majority of the Yemeni people, however, unification proved economically disastrous. Per capita income for Yemeni workers dropped 10% between 1989 and 1993. In the same period, prices for food and basic goods skyrocketed, unemployment reached 25% and nearly one in three Yemenis lived in poverty.

    While the majority suffered extreme hardships from unification, the small class of wealthy in the north made dramatic gains in this period by privatizing the south's socialized industries, confiscating peasant land and stealing oil revenue from government coffers. This unified Yemeni government, led by Ali Abdullah Saleh, also aligned itself closely with the U.S. and Saudi Arabia, generating popular discontent and protest. After the outbreak of a brief civil war in the south by former PDRY elements, Saleh's government heavily repressed the Yemeni Socialist Party (YSP) to eliminate any challenge to its rule.

    The Houthi insurgency and the national democratic revolution

    Shortly thereafter, Saleh's government faced another challenge to its rule – this time from the north. The Houthi insurgency began in 2004 among the rural Shi'a populations living in northern Yemen, who make up about a third of the entire country. Yemen's Shi'a communities faced extreme poverty and persecution from Saleh since before reunification. Influenced by the liberation theology of Hassan Nasrallah of Hezbollah, the Houthis formed with the goal of driving out U.S. imperialism, Saudi domination and their puppet rulers.

    Triggered in part by the wave of Arab uprisings in 2011, the Houthis joined with other popular forces in Yemen to drive Saleh out of power. Fearing the loss of Yemen as a neo-colony, the U.S. and Saudi Arabia installed another puppet, Abd Rabbuh Mansur Hadi, in his place. Hadi's government continued the corrupt economic policies of Saleh and abandoned the political reforms agreed to by opposition forces. Hadi, like Saleh, also allowed the U.S. free reign to conduct drone strikes throughout the country.

    The crisis in Yemen reached a boiling point in 2014, when Houthi rebels stormed the presidential palace in Sanaa, the country's capital, and placed Hadi under house arrest. Having seized state power and having begun laying the ground for an inclusive democratic republic, the Houthi government immediately came under military siege by the Saudi-led GCC coalition.

    The empire strikes back

    On the whole, this intervention has not gone well for Saudi Arabia. It began as an aerial bombing campaign, but the Saudi-led coalition eventually committed ground troops to directly fight Houthi forces. The coalition has experienced high casualties and it has largely failed to unseat the Houthis from country's populated urban centers.

    Furthermore, these attacks on Yemen have forged a large united front of unlikely partners. In May 2015, deposed President Saleh and a large section of Yemen's national military announced an alliance with the Houthi insurgency aimed at defeating the Saudi-led coalition. Although Saleh ruled Yemen as an ally of the U.S. before popular protests forced his resignation in 2012, he has come out in support of the national democratic forces resisting foreign intervention.

    Saudi Arabia faces widespread international opposition to its campaign in Yemen, largely owing to the many documented atrocities committed by coalition forces. An as-of-yet-unpublished U.N. panel report from January found evidence of “widespread and systematic” targeting of civilians by coalition forces, including “bombing residential neighborhoods” and “treating the entire cities of Sa’dah and Maran as military targets.”

    While not actively engaged in combat, the U.S. stands firmly behind this vicious war on Yemen. From their perspective, a Houthi-led national democratic government in Yemen would oppose U.S. drone strikes and counter Western aggression toward the camp of resistance. As Saudi Arabia's main supplier of weapons, warplanes and military equipment to the tune of several hundred billion dollars, U.S. imperialism literally makes the entire assault possible.

    Crisis and resistance in the Arabian peninsula

    U.S. imperialism is in a period of deep crisis, particularly in the Middle East. The occupation of Iraq ended in defeat for the U.S. and the occupation government it left to govern now leans towards Iran. Its attempts to destabilize the national democratic governments of Iran and Syria have failed. Popular democratic forces in countries like Bahrain and Yemen shook, and in some cases overthrew, long-standing puppet governments.

    At the center of these victories are the anti-imperialist forces in the Middle East, which comprise a camp of resistance. Anchored by the Islamic Republic of Iran, the camp of resistance includes the Syrian Arab Republic, Hezbollah and the patriotic forces of Lebanon, the Palestinian liberation organizations and other allied national democratic movements in the Middle East.

    Saudi Arabia's attack on Yemen reflects its growing desperation and weakening ability to project influence in the region. Along with the U.S., Turkey and the Gulf Cooperation Council monarchies, Saudi Arabia invested heavily in toppling the Syrian government in order to strike a blow against Iran – its largest competitor for regional influence. The failure to overthrow Assad – due in part to intervention by Hezbollah, Iran and Russia – and its inability to control the anti-Assad opposition groups like Islamic State speak to the sharply declining influence of Saudi Arabia.

    As an anachronistic religious monarchy built by imported migrant labor and the craven exploitation of natural resources, the House of Saud's wealth masks its vulnerability to crises in imperialism. Fearing an increase of U.S. domestic oil production, the Saudi monarchy flooded the world market with cheap oil, which further drove down falling energy prices. As a result, the country faces a widening deficit from the decline in oil revenues and eroding investor confidence by imperialist powers.

    The Saudi monarchy increasingly reacts to this deepening crisis with brutal and disproportionate political repression. Opposition movements terrify the House of Saud, which promotes anti-Shi'a sectarianism to drum up support for aggression against Iran. This fear fuels increasingly drastic actions, like the execution of Shi'a cleric Sheikh Nimr al-Nimr, along with 46 other dissidents and prisoners, at the start of 2016.

    Saudi Arabia exaggerates the level of Iranian support for the Houthi insurgency. Iranian officials have expressed solidarity with the Houthis as part of the camp of resistance. Reports indicate that they have provided weapons to the insurgents in response to the GCC's brutal onslaught. Facing the looming threat of U.S. and Israeli aggression, Iran has an obvious interest in seeing anti-imperialist movements like the Houthis come to power because it strengthens the camp of resistance.

    However, the Houthi insurgency is not a proxy army of Iran like the Western media portrays. It's a popular movement with strong roots among the Yemeni people, who have had enough brutality inflicted on them by imperialist powers. And their stand in the face of unrelenting attacks deserves our support and solidarity.

    Read more News and Views from the Peoples Struggle at http://www.fightbacknews.org. You can write to us at info@fightbacknews.org
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    Houthis are a shi'ite movement, while the Hadis are Sunni. So its pretty clear that both Iran and Saudi.A are trying their best to promote sectarian violence for their imperialist ambitions.
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    Praise of for the nasserist republic at the same time as promoting the guys from the territory that used to be that of the saudi-backed Badr loyalists, paired with the description of Hezbollah (who I've even cheerleaded before) as liberation theology
    the term "national democratic" finds its lowest use here.
    I ALMOST DIED OF A DRUG OVERDOSE BECAUSE OF ANARCHISM AND PUNK ROCK
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    If Yemen could be an imperialist power would it pass up the chance?
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    One Year of Killing in Yemen

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    Chris –
    Today marks one year since Saudi Arabia began what they said would be “short-term” military involvement in Yemen’s civil war. In the 365 days since, using American-made fighter jets, cluster bombs, and other munitions, more than 3,000 innocent Yemeni civilians have been killed, many of them in ways that may amount to war crimes. It is far past time for the United States to stand up and say “enough is enough” and repudiate Saudi aggression and killing in Yemen.

    Tell Secretary of State John Kerry to press the Saudis to end the bombing in Yemen, sign a permanent peace agreement and provide a joint aid package to rebuild the country.

    U.S.-supplied F-15s and cluster bombs have been used extensively in the bombing campaign in Yemen, resulting in thousands of deaths of Yemeni civilians as well as significant damage to Yemen’s infrastructure and rich architectural history. The Saudi-led bombing raids have been conducted indiscriminately, killing journalists and destroying multiple buildings in a Doctors Without Borders facility.

    The situation in Yemen in the wake of a year of relentless bombing has been described as a “humanitarian catastrophe” by the United Nations, with 21 million people in need of some kind of aid, 7.6 million people "severely food-insecure", and over 3.4 million children out of school. That the United States supplied the weapons that caused this devastation and still remains silent in the face of such horror is unconscionable.

    A ceasefire has been announced that will go into effect April 10. The U.S. should support the ceasefire and use it as an opportunity to push for peace talks, then provide aid for rebuilding Yemen once peace has been achieved. Use our action page to tell John Kerry to press for an end to the bombing in Yemen and to provide humanitarian aid to rebuild the country.

    We cannot undo the damage that has been done in Yemen, but we can speak out to prevent any more damage from occurring and help repair what our weapons have wrought. Thank you for joining us in calling for peace and justice for the Yemeni people.

    Sincerely,
    Alice, Alli, Ariel, Chelsea, Janet, Jodie, Marwa, Medea, Michaela, Nancy, Rebecca, Sam and Tighe

    PS: You don't want to miss this harrowing new segment about life inside of Saudi Arabia made jointly by PBS and ITV -- watch it and share it with your friends!

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    Default Congress MUST Protect Yemen!

    Congress MUST Protect Yemen!



    Chris —

    For the last month, Bushra from the CODEPINK DC office has been collecting, editing and posting a series of videos of Yemenis talking candidly about the death and destruction in their homeland caused by the relentless bombing campaign led by Saudi Arabia. Called Voices from Yemen, the series is powerful and haunting. Will you take a few minutes to watch and share the videos?

    The voices of women and children mourning for their country in these videos deepens our resolve: We MUST push Congress to block the sale of further weapons to Saudi Arabia!

    In the latest video, 10 year-old Yara Al-Mutawakel tells the story of how war broke out on the eve of a school concert she was excited to get to play. Her excitement about playing music with her schoolmates quickly turned to horror as she learned that people were dying in the streets as Saudi Arabia mercilessly bombed her country. At one point in the video she cries out, “I don’t want it to be my turn to die!”

    It is reprehensible that the Obama administration has approved the sale of weapons that will continue to terrorize millions and cause more civilian deaths in Yemen. Prominent human rights organizations have stated that Saudi targeting of civilians in Yemen constitutes a war crime. Our one glimmer of hope that we might do the right thing as a nation by pushing Congress to block the sale of these weapons.

    Even if you’ve contacted them before, please, take five minutes now to tell your Senators to support S.J. Res 39, the bill to block the sale of weapons to Saudi Arabia.

    In solidarity with Yemen,

    Alice, Alli, Ariel, Bushra, Chelsea, Janet, Jodie, Jules, Mariana, Martha, Max, Medea, Nancy, and Sam

    P.S. We’ve been hearing from coalition partners that there are multiple Senators who are still undecided on this issue. Your message could be the push they need to support SJ Res 39!

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    Default Tell Obama: End U.S. Support for Saudi Bombing Campaign in Yemen

    Tell Obama: End U.S. Support for Saudi Bombing Campaign in Yemen


    Just Foreign Policy

    Dear Chris,

    Urge President Obama & Congress to end U.S. support for the Saudi-led war in Yemen.

    Take Action

    Following a bombing attack by Saudi-led forces on a funeral in Yemen, the White House announced an “immediate review” of U.S. support for the Saudi Arabia-led military campaign in Yemen. "U.S. security cooperation with Saudi Arabia is not a blank check," the White House statement said.

    Urge President Obama & Congress to end U.S. support for the Saudi bombing campaign in Yemen by signing our petition at MoveOn.

    Connecticut Senator Chris Murphy said: "Saudi airstrikes, with support from the United States, have killed thousands of civilians in Yemen. ‎Yesterday's attack on large funeral party follows months of attacks on schools, homes, and hospitals…we are past the point of strongly worded statements. If the U.S. is serious when it says our support for Saudi Arabia isn't a blank check, then it's time to prove it -- because it's clear the Saudi-led coalition isn't listening. The administration should pull U.S. support for the Saudi-led war in Yemen because it's harming America's national security, enabling terrorist groups to thrive, and killing innocent civilians.”

    Oxfam said: "This weekend’s attack on a funeral home in Sana’a was a gruesome act that served no purpose except to deepen Yemen’s misery. With more than 140 dead and more than 525 injured according to early reports, this was a massacre of civilians, apparently carried out by Saudi warplanes fueled and supported by the United States…. the US announced that it will immediately review its support to the Saudi-led coalition. This review ... should conclude immediately, with the withdrawal of all US support, including the sale of arms, to the parties. Any other choice signals ongoing indifference to the thousands of Yemenis killed by airstrikes and the millions on the verge of starvation thanks to a senseless, preventable conflict. The US must throw its full weight behind a political settlement, it cannot be a peace broker and an arms broker at the same time."

    Urge President Obama & Congress to end U.S. support for the Saudi bombing campaign in Yemen by signing and sharing our petition.

    Thanks for all you do to help make U.S. foreign policy more just,

    Robert Naiman, Avram Reisman, and Sarah Burns
    Just Foreign Policy

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    References:
    . https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press...ed-price-yemen
    2. https://www.murphy.senate.gov/newsro...aign-in-yemen-
    3. https://www.oxfamamerica.org/press/s...eds-of-people/

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    Default Will criticism of Saudis morph into real pressure?

    Will criticism of Saudis morph into real pressure?


    Just Foreign Policy


    Dear Chris,

    Urge President Obama to stop supporting the Saudi war in Yemen.

    Take Action

    "Missile strike in Yemen: Will criticism of Saudis morph into real pressure?" That's a headline in the Christian Science Monitor today.

    Urge President Obama to move from criticism to real pressure by signing our petition at MoveOn.

    A New York Times editorial today says:

    "Airstrikes by a Saudi-led coalition that devastated a funeral in Yemen on Saturday make it clear that the United States must end its complicity in a civil war that has caused a humanitarian catastrophe in one of the world’s poorest countries and fueled extremism. It is within President Obama’s power to do so. Saudi Arabia and its Gulf state allies depend on Washington for aircraft, munitions, training and in-flight refueling."
    The Intercept reports:

    "Fragments of what appear to be U.S.-made bombs have been found at the scene of one of the most horrific civilian massacres of Saudi Arabia’s 18-month air campaign in Yemen."
    Reuters reports:

    "The Obama administration went ahead with a $1.3 billion arms sale to Saudi Arabia last year despite warnings from some officials that the United States could be implicated in war crimes for supporting a Saudi-led air campaign in Yemen that has killed thousands of civilians, according to government documents and the accounts of current and former officials."
    From WikiLeaks, we learn that in August 2014 Hillary Clinton reported matter-of-factly to John Podesta, based on U.S. intelligence reports, that the governments of Saudi Arabia and Qatar were "providing clandestine financial and logistic support to ISIL and other radical Sunni groups in the region."

    Urge President Obama to move from criticism to real pressure by signing and sharing our petition.

    Thanks for all you do to help make U.S. foreign policy more just,

    Robert Naiman, Avram Reisman, and Sarah Burns
    Just Foreign Policy

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    References:
    1. http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Middl...-real-pressure
    2. http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/11/op...-in-yemen.html
    3. https://theintercept.com/2016/10/10/...ral-masssacre/
    4. http://www.reuters.com/article/us-us...-idUSKCN12A0BQ
    5. http://www.salon.com/2016/10/11/leak...upported-isis/

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    Default NYT: Acknowledge ongoing U.S. "military involvement" in Yemen's civil war

    NYT: Acknowledge ongoing U.S. "military involvement" in Yemen's civil war

    Just Foreign Policy

    Dear Chris,

    Urge the NYT to acknowledge that U.S. military involvement in Yemen's civil war is ongoing.

    Take Action

    A recent New York Times report claimed that U.S. cruise missile strikes against Houthi rebels in Yemen "marked the first time the United States has become involved militarily in the civil war between the Houthis, an indigenous Shiite group with loose connections to Iran, and the Yemeni government, which is backed by Saudi Arabia and other Sunni nations."

    Urge the NYT to acknowledge that U.S. military involvement in Yemen's civil war is ongoing by signing our petition at MoveOn.

    The U.S. was already "involved militarily in the civil war" prior to the missile strike. Human Rights Watch notes: "The US became a party to the conflict during the first months of fighting by providing specific targeting information and refueling planes during bombing raids." HRW identified the munition used in a Saudi Arabia-led coalition airstrike on a funeral ceremony in Sanaa on October 8 as a US-manufactured air-dropped GBU-12 Paveway II 500-pound laser-guided bomb. HRW described the attack, which killed at least 100 people and wounded more than 500, including children, as "an apparent war crime."

    Understanding that the U.S. was and remains "militarily involved" is crucial for understanding U.S. responsibility, for establishing context for the reported missile strike on the U.S. ship, and for understanding Congressional responsibility. Congress has never voted to authorize a U.S. war against Houthi rebels in Yemen. If the U.S. is engaged in "hostilities" against Houthi rebels that have not been authorized by Congress, then Congress has an obligation under the Constitution and the War Powers Resolution to either pass an authorization for the use of force, or to vote on the withdrawal of U.S. forces from the conflict.

    Urge the New York Times to correct the record concerning ongoing U.S. military involvement in Yemen's civil war by signing and sharing our petition.

    Thanks for all you do to help make U.S. foreign policy more just,

    Robert Naiman, Avram Reisman, and Sarah Burns
    Just Foreign Policy

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    References:
    1. http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/13/wo...e-warship.html
    2. https://www.hrw.org/news/2016/10/13/...rent-war-crime
    3. http://www.cnn.com/videos/tv/2016/08...-interview.cnn

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    Default Saudi Arabia: Stop Endangering U.S. Troops!

    Saudi Arabia: Stop Endangering U.S. Troops!

    Just Foreign Policy

    Dear Chris,

    Join the Obama Administration in demanding that Saudi Arabia agree to an immediate, unconditional ceasefire in Yemen.

    Take Action

    The Obama Administration is demanding that Saudi Arabia agree to an immediate, unconditional ceasefire in Yemen or risk losing future U.S. military aid.

    The Washington Post reports that "Saudi airstrikes on Yemeni civilians may have put a target on the backs of U.S. troops."

    Demand that Saudi Arabia agree to an immediate and unconditional ceasefire in Yemen and stop endangering U.S. troops by signing and sharing our petition.

    Thanks for all you do to help make U.S. foreign policy more just,

    Robert Naiman, Avram Reisman, and Sarah Burns
    Just Foreign Policy

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    References:
    1. https://www.washingtonpost.com/world...cc0_story.html
    2. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...of-u-s-troops/

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    Default UN Announces Agreement on Yemen Ceasefire!

    UN Announces Agreement on Yemen Ceasefire!

    Just Foreign Policy

    Dear Chris,

    U.N. special envoy to Yemen Ismail Ould Cheikh Ahmed has announced [1] there is agreement for a 72-hour ceasefire in Yemen that will take effect shortly before midnight Wednesday, and that the ceasefire may be renewed, hopefully to be made permanent.

    This is happening, in significant measure, because of Administration pressure on Saudi Arabia - the announcement came days after Administration officials threatened [2] that future U.S. military aid to Saudi Arabia would be contingent on Saudi agreement to an immediate and unconditional ceasefire. Administration pressure is happening, in significant measure, because of Congressional pressure. And Congressional pressure is happening, in significant measure, because of public pressure on Congress. So, everyone who took action to urge Congress to put pressure on U.S. participation in the Saudi war in Yemen can take some share of the credit.

    We're not done, obviously. We must remain vigilant to make sure that the ceasefire happens, that it is extended, that it is made permanent. If the ceasefire collapses, we must be ready to apply pressure to restore the ceasefire.

    But: we're making progress. A ceasefire will save lives. It will allow the safe passage of humanitarian aid. It will help prepare conditions for a political and diplomatic resolution of the conflict. So, thank you for taking action.

    And thanks for all you do to help make U.S. foreign policy more just.

    Robert Naiman, Avram Reisman, and Sarah Burns
    Just Foreign Policy

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    References:
    1. https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...official-tweet
    2. https://www.washingtonpost.com/world...cc0_story.html

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    Default General Flynn: Urge that we stop helping Saudi Arabia bomb Yemen

    General Flynn: Urge that we stop helping Saudi Arabia bomb Yemen


    Just Foreign Policy


    Dear Chris,

    Urge the incoming Administration to stop helping Saudi Arabia bomb Yemen.

    Take Action

    President-elect Trump and his advisers have expressed opposition to U.S. wars that don't contribute to the fight against ISIS and Al-Qaeda. Therefore, they should oppose continued U.S. participation in the Saudi bombing of Yemen, because that doesn't contribute to the fight against ISIS and Al-Qaeda. Whatever one may think of the Houthi rebels in Yemen that the U.S. has been helping Saudi Arabia bomb, they are not ISIS or Al-Qaeda; they hate ISIS and Al-Qaeda. In fact, the U.S.-backed Saudi war in Yemen has contributed to the growth of ISIS and Al-Qaeda in Yemen.

    Urge incoming National Security Adviser General Michael Flynn to oppose continued U.S. participation in the Saudi bombing of Yemen by signing our petition at MoveOn.

    Thanks for all you do to help make U.S. foreign policy more just,

    Robert Naiman, Avram Reisman, and Sarah Burns
    Just Foreign Policy

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    hii
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    Default Another Victory...

    Another Victory...

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    Dear Chris,

    Did you hear the good news that the Obama administration just blocked a new sale of weapons to Saudi Arabia? Concerned over the high rate of civilian casualties caused by the Saudi bombings in Yemen, the White House stopped a Raytheon sale of 16,000 guided munition kits valued at $350 million. This a great step forward — thanks to all your calls and signing of our petitions. We must keep pushing. Tell Congress to stop ALL weapons sales!

    Blocking these munition kits is good, but it’s not enough. Other weapons are still being sold to the Saudis. Just last week, the State Department announced plans to sell Chinook cargo helicopters and other equipment worth $3.51 billion! And the US military continues to refuel Saudi aircraft and provide intelligence information for the Yemen attacks. Moreover, a Trump administration might well restore all weapons sales.

    That’s why we need Congress to step up. Congress has the right to stop any sales authorized by the State Department, but has refused to exercise its authority. Tell your reps that it’s shameful the US is participating in war crimes the Saudis are committing in Yemen. Tell them to stop all weapons sales to the Saudi regime.

    In 2015 the Saudi government became involved with the internal conflict in neighboring Yemen because it was worried that a more pro-Iran faction — the Houthis — would take over the government. Since then, the Saudis have been pounding Yemen with U.S. bombs and logistical support. This 20-month-old war has killed over 10,000 people and sparked a severe humanitarian crisis, including acute food shortages, in the poorest country in the Middle East. UNICEF reports that Yemen’s child malnutrition is at an all-time high, with severe acute malnutrition sapping the lives of over 400,000 children. The tragedy is so profound that every ten minutes, a child in Yemen dies from malnutrition. To save the children, we must stop the war.

    For the sake of the children,
    Ariel, Farida, Jodie, Mariana, Mark, Medea, Nancy, Paki, Paula, and Samira

    P.S. Join us on a unique trip to Honduras and Nicaragua on February 17-26 with the Alliance for Global Justice. We'll look at rural development, women's empowerment and opportunities for solidarity. Check here for more info and to sign up.

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    Blocking these munition kits is good, but it’s not enough. Other weapons are still being sold to the Saudis. Just last week, the State Department announced plans to sell Chinook cargo helicopters and other equipment worth $3.51 billion!
    Meanwhile...

    Originally Posted by The Globe & Mail
    Canada is showing no sign of similarly restricting or limiting exports such as the armoured vehicle sale. The federal government says the contract – 70 per cent of which Mr. Dion approved for export in April – is the largest advanced manufacturing export contract in Canada’s history. The machines are equipped with medium-gauge machine guns or cannons that can shoot anti-tank missiles.
    "I'm a pessimist because of intelligence, but an optimist because of will." - Antonio Gramsci

    "If he did advocate revolutionary change, such advocacy could not, of course, receive constitutional protection, since it would be by definition anti-constitutional."
    - J.A. MacGuigan in Roach v. Canada, 1994
  16. #16
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    Default Congress: Invoke War Powers on Saudi-Yemen Before Military Escalation on Iran

    Congress: Invoke War Powers on Saudi-Yemen Before Military Escalation on Iran


    Just Foreign Policy

    Dear Chris,

    Urge your reps. to force debate & vote on Saudi-Yemen war before further escalation.

    Take Action

    Two Saudi sailors have been killed by Houthi rebels in Yemen in what Saudi Arabia has called a suicide boat attack and Houthi rebels have called a missile attack. Fox News reported that the Pentagon believes the attack was meant for a U.S. warship. Trump Administration national security adviser Michael Flynn blamed Iran and threatened unspecified retaliation against Iran.

    Urge your reps. to force debate & vote on Saudi-Yemen war before further escalation by signing our petition at MoveOn.

    This dangerous situation was anticipated by Congress when it passed the signing and sharing our petition.

    Thanks for all you do to help make U.S. foreign policy more just,

    Robert Naiman, Avram Reisman, and Sarah Burns
    Just Foreign Policy

    If you think our work is important, support us with a $17 donation.
    http://www.justforeignpolicy.org/donate

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  17. #17
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    Default NYT: Don't Make Yemen's Houthi Rebels' Actions a "Casus Belli" With Iran

    NYT: Don't Make Yemen's Houthi Rebels' Actions a "Casus Belli" With Iran


    Just Foreign Policy


    Dear Chris,

    Tell the NYT to stop characterizing Houthi rebels in Yemen as proxies for Iran.

    Take Action

    As Connecticut Senator Chris Murphy has warned, National Security Advisor Michael Flynn promoted dangerous escalation when he suggested that attacks by Yemen's Houthi rebels on Saudi forces could lead to war between the United States and Iran. As Sen. Murphy noted, Iran does not command nor control Houthi rebels fighting against U.S.-backed Saudi forces in Yemen.

    Unfortunately, the New York Times editorial board has supported Flynn's dangerous claim that Houthi rebels in Yemen are Iran's proxies. "Flynn was right," the NYT said, "in highlighting Iran’s troubling behavior, including the recent attack on a Saudi Navy patrol boat by Iranian-backed Houthi rebels from Yemen."

    Urge the NYT to correct the record by signing our petition at MoveOn.

    By characterizing the Houthi attack as "Iran's behavior," the NYT promoted the dangerous claim that Iran was responsible for the Houthis' action as if it were settled fact, while providing no evidence for the claim. By this standard of evidence, if the Houthis' intent were to attack a U.S. ship, as Fox News reported - or misreported - that the Pentagon believed, then it was Iran's intent to attack a U.S. ship. It's not wildly implausible that the Houthis might intend to attack a U.S. ship - it has happened before, and unlike Iran, the U.S. is a direct participant in Saudi Arabia's war in Yemen, even though U.S. participation in Saudi Arabia's war in Yemen has never been authorized by Congress, contrary to the intent of the Constitution and the War Powers Resolution.

    Urge the Times to correct the record and urge the Times and Members of Congress to refrain from characterizing Yemen's Houthis as Iran's proxies in the future by signing and sharing our petition.

    Thanks for all you do to help make U.S. foreign policy more just,

    Robert Naiman, Avram Reisman, and Sarah Burns
    Just Foreign Policy

    If you think our work is important, support us with a $17 donation.
    http://www.justforeignpolicy.org/donate


    1. Sen. Chris Murphy, "A Reckless Slide Toward War With Iran," http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/...b02bbb1816b8d3
    2. https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/03/o...with-iran.html
    3. https://theintercept.com/2017/02/02/...an-act-of-war/
    4. http://www.reuters.com/article/us-ye...-idUSKCN12A082
    5. http://www.cnn.com/videos/tv/2016/08...interview.cnn; http://www.cnn.com/2016/09/21/politi...-saudi-arabia/
    6. http://avalon.law.yale.edu/20th_century/warpower.asp

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  18. #18
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    Default

    'Obama's father was 87.5% Arab, 12.5% African negro.' (Matar, Women in Green, Jerusalem, June 2008) Apparently, the Kenyan government requires this distinction on identification documents. During this time, the vote for Obama was 99% in Cuyahoga County, Ohio. On the north-south axis, of interest is Karmon's Hezbollah America Latina: Strange Group or Real Threat?
  19. #19
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    Default TODAY: Help me press Durbin, Duckworth in Chicago on Saudi-Yemen war powers

    TODAY: Help me press Durbin, Duckworth in Chicago on Saudi-Yemen war powers

    Just Foreign Policy

    Dear Chris,

    President Trump has already "increased logistical support" for the Saudi bombing of Houthis in Yemen. [1] Trump Administration officials are threatening to conduct drone strikes against the Houthis. [2] But Congress never authorized this war. Under the War Powers Resolution, a single Member of Congress could force a debate and vote on what Trump is doing. Unfortunately, we haven't got a single Member of Congress to agree to do this yet.

    That’s why I'm going to visit the offices of Senator Durbin and Senator Duckworth in Chicago today. I'm going to deliver the Illinois signatures on this petition, urging Durbin and Duckworth to stand up on Saudi-Yemen war powers before Trump can further escalate the war.

    Here's how you can help:

    1. Call Durbin's Chicago office at 312-353-4952 and/or Duckworth's Chicago office at (312) 886-3506. When you reach a staffer or leave a message, you can say:

    "I urge Senator Durbin and Senator Duckworth to invoke the War Powers Resolution to force Congressional debate on Trump's escalation of the Saudi war in Yemen."

    When you've made your call(s), please report that here.

    2. Sign and share our petition if you haven't already. If you already signed and shared, please share it again.

    Thanks for all you do to help make U.S. foreign policy more just,

    Robert Naiman
    Just Foreign Policy

    If you think our work is important, support us with a $17 donation.
    http://www.justforeignpolicy.org/donate

    References:
    1. http://www.reuters.com/article/us-ye...-idUSKBN15M1HP
    2. "Yemen Is the First Battleground in Trump’s Confrontation With Iran: The administration has its sights set on checkmating Tehran’s ambitions across the region. Iran’s proxies in Yemen are in the crosshairs," Foreign Policy, February 3, http://foreignpolicy.com/2017/02/03/...ion-with-iran/

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  20. #20
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    Default Urge "French Bernie Sanders" to Challenge Trump Plan to Push Yemen Into Famine

    Urge "French Bernie Sanders" to Challenge Trump Plan to Push Yemen Into Famine


    Just Foreign Policy


    Dear Chris,

    Urge Mélenchon to challenge Trump's backing of the Saudi war in Yemen.

    Take Action


    Progressive French presidential candidate Jean-Luc Mélenchon - the "French Bernie Sanders" - is now a "frontrunner" in the first round of the French presidential election. That is giving him an unprecedented platform in global media, which he has used, among other things, to challenge Trump's military attack on Syria. When he addressed tens of thousands of people in Toulouse Sunday, the crowd roared when Mélenchon slammed Trump over Trump's illegal attack on Syria. "No Frenchman can accept a global gendarme who decided all by himself the good and the bad," Mélenchon said. [1]

    Urge Mélenchon to challenge Trump's support for Saudi Arabia's catastrophic war in Yemen by signing our petition at MoveOn.

    As a leader of what will soon be the only EU country with a permanent seat on the UN Security Council, Mélenchon has a unique ability to serve as a "check and balance" on Trump's global warmongering. It was France that led the global opposition to Bush's illegal 2003 invasion of Iraq. If Mélenchon can stand up to Trump on Syria, he can stand up to Trump on Saudi Arabia's catastrophic war in Yemen, which the Trump Administration wants to escalate. Trump Administration officials want to help Saudi Arabia and the UAE attack the Yemeni port of Hodeida, which the UN, aid groups, former US officials, and 55 Members of the House have warned would likely push Yemen into famine. [2]

    Urge Mélenchon to challenge Trump's support for Saudi Arabia's catastrophic war in Yemen by signing and sharing our petition.

    Thanks for all you do to help make U.S. foreign policy more just,

    Robert Naiman, Avram Reisman, and Sarah Burns
    Just Foreign Policy

    If you think our work is important, support us with a $17 donation.
    http://www.justforeignpolicy.org/donate

    References:
    1. https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/16/w...-election.html
    2. https://www.commondreams.org/news/20...y-action-yemen

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